Prev topicNext topicHelp

Topic 18 of 55: The Italian Renaissance

Sat, Aug 8, 1998 (05:40) | Riette Walton (riette)
Not only in sciences (RAY!!!), society and government, but also in the arts Italy was the major catalyst for progress during the Renaissance. Because of the many different fields in which it applied, Renaissance is a word with many facets to its meaning.
Therefore Renaissance painting cannot signify any one common or clearly definable style, and hopefully I will not make any mistakes when I post paintings in here, which I think date back to this era. Renaissance art was born out of a new, fasty evolvin

civilization, and marked a point of departure from the medieval to the modern world.
93 responses total.

 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 1 of 93: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (07:15) * 2 lines 
 
Which Renaissance artists come to mind, Riette?



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 2 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (08:55) * 15 lines 
 
Sure. And this was the age of some of the REALLY famous painters. Again, with examples which I shall in time post for us to discuss:

Masaccio (Adam and Eve 1427)
Fra Angelico (Beheading of St. Cosmas and St. Damian 1438-1440)
Piero Della Francesca (Resurrection of Christ 1450)
Sandro Botticelli (Primavera 1482)
Leonardo da Vinci (Virgin of the rocks 1508)
Michelangelo (Ignudo from the Sistine Chapel 1503-1512)
Raphael (Bindo Altoviti 1515)
Titian (Venus and Adonis 1560)
Correggio (Venus, Satyr and Cupid 1514-1530)
Tintoretto (Conversion of St. Paul 1545)
El Greco (Madonna and child with St. Martina and St. Agnes 1597-1599)




 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 3 of 93: Renate  (Renata) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (16:57) * 7 lines 
 
Gruezi, Riette and everybody!

I like Cellini's "Perseo":
(well, hope it works - wasn't very good in posting pics recently)





 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 4 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (21:22) * 1 lines 
 
Is that Perseo's sword, or is he just glad to see me? :-)


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 5 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Aug 12, 1998 (01:09) * 4 lines 
 
ha-ha!!!

Stunning sculpture, Renate! But I do find most of his sculptures a little 'dry' and lacking the feeling - it must be because he was also a goldsmith; it must have been very difficult to transfer such minute, precise work to a very large scale. But the
craftsmanship is still magnificent.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 6 of 93: Renate  (Renata) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (02:27) * 1 lines 
 
Don't remember any of his other work, but I guess I know what you mean. Though, as Autumn points out, you cannot say this one lacks display of feeling :-). I refer to his triumphant posture, in case you wonder.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 7 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (05:44) * 5 lines 
 
You are right: the posture is pretty triumphant. For me it just lacks that certain ... oh, I don't know how to call it. Like the sort of statue that belongs on the roof of a Swiss bank - triumphant enough, but not the sort of thing that'll make me look
twice if I saw it in a museum. To me a truly good sculpture is one in which the posture, the expression on the face, the hands, each have their own tale to tell. I don't want to be able to tell straight away: okay, this guy is holding a cup, which he i

going to drink from. So what. I want to see him WANT the wine, I want his tongue to play across his lips in anticipation of the drinking of the wine, I want to be able to imagine his hand tighten around the cup as he brings it to his mouth, I want to s
ee his eyes close as he is about to take the first sip. Do you know what I mean? That sort of human feeling complimenting the brilliant craftsmanship.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 8 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (05:53) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 9 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (06:02) * 3 lines 
 
Damn! Let's try again. . .




 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 10 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (06:03) * 1 lines 
 
OH, bugger.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 11 of 93: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (09:30) * 4 lines 
 
You just add the quotes and you'll have it. After img sorce put quotes
before the http and before the closing angle bracket. You're a hair
bredth away from getting it. Go, Riette!



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 12 of 93: Renate  (Renata) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (16:43) * 1 lines 
 
I would like to see the pic, Riette, now I am really curious. Post the address, if not the link. But, I think I know what you mean. You seem to prefer the expressive variety of art. :-)


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 13 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (01:32) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, that's it, I think. But that doesn't make the more 'precise' works of art any less good - I have great respect for all of the great artists of our past. I could certainly never even dream of posessing the talent and precision and skill those men possessed.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 14 of 93: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sat, Aug 15, 1998 (23:58) * 6 lines 
 


The Virgin and Child
by Masaccio
1426
135x75cm


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 15 of 93: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sun, Aug 16, 1998 (00:01) * 1 lines 
 
(I thinks I finally got up alls that you sent me, Mistress...)


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 16 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug 16, 1998 (01:34) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you so much, my sweet slave.

Okay so this is one of Masaccio's early works, painted for a church in Pisa. I chose this one, because it is in some ways such an omen of art to come. Madonna is a block of dignity, sitting there on her throne, (worrying about Josef's recent hairloss?) while the Child is completely stripped of Byzantine kingliness. He is a real baby. He is ugly and fat, He sucks his fingers, and stares into space. And then there is the way He is touched by the Madonna. Look at the tiny little hand lying in her's - i
is really moving. There is beautifully combined strength and vulnerability in this painting. It was a first move towards real expression and feeling in art.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 17 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sun, Aug 16, 1998 (21:13) * 1 lines 
 
I like the way Jesus has lost that miniature adult look. That always seemed so creepy.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 18 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (06:03) * 1 lines 
 
I know - I hate that about early Christian Art; some of those pictures seem almost evil to me.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 19 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (06:22) * 23 lines 
 
Okay, here's our next picture:



Sandro Botticelli
'Primavera'
1482
315cm x 205cm

Unfortunately the photo does not do the real painting any justice - probably because it's such a large painting. The real colours are just stunning - lots of reds and light blues.

Botticelli's paintings really stand out for me, because of their beautiful contours, the precise draftsmanship, and a sophisticated understanding of perpective, anatomy - though these elements never overshadow the sheer poetry of his vision.

I can't quite make out what the actual subject of 'Primavera' is - unlike 'Primavera and the birth of Venus', also by him. (I'll try and post it after this one for you to see.)

'Primavera' seems to be an allegory on the harmony of nature and contains many mythical figures:
There is Venus (who symbolizes the link between nature and civilization), and Mercury.
At the right of the painting, the figure of Zephyr, the west wind of spring, is seen chasing Chloris, who is then transformed into Flora, the goddess of flowers.
A blindfolded Cupid shoots his arrows at the Three Graces, who were the handmaidens of Venus. They represent the three phases of love: beauty, desire and fulfillment.

Berenson once said of Botticelli: 'He appears almost as if haunted by the idea of communicating the unembodied values of touch and movement."

Beautiful, isn't it?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 20 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (17:43) * 1 lines 
 
they all look pregnant....which is lovely in itself.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 21 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (18:20) * 1 lines 
 
I was thinking the same thing, Wolf! I wondered if they were representing fertility, in accordance with the spring theme, or if it was just his style.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 22 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (01:01) * 1 lines 
 
I think it could well be that they represent fertility - in some of his paintings the women don't look pregnant. I'll post 'Birth of Venus' if I can find it next.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 23 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (01:19) * 12 lines 
 
As I am sitting here, staring at my own photo of this incredible painting, another thing strikes me about it. Everything about it is life-enhancing - yet it offers no safeguards against suffering or accident: did you notice that Cupid is blindfolded as he flies? It gives the poetry of this painting an underlying wistfulness, that sort of nostalgia we get from time to time for something that we cannot possess, but something with which we feel deeply in tune.

And now, look at this:



Sandro Botticelli
'Birth of Venus'
1485-86
175cm x 280cm

Look at how this longing is even more visible in the face of Venus as she is standing there, naked, fragile, sweet. And Flora holds out a garment to her, as if to say: We cannot look upon love unclothed; we are too weak, too wretched to bear the beauty.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 24 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (22:10) * 5 lines 
 
i see Venus as perfectly comfortable in her skin and the covering of her
womanly features is for our benefit. Flora is almost wanting just to cover her
up. but look how beautiful she is just the way she is. she has no insecurities.
so what's up with the two beings on the left?



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 25 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Aug 19, 1998 (01:16) * 1 lines 
 
The two beings on the right are Zephyr, the west wind of spring, who has caught Chloris (from the previous picture), and Flora on the right, is what he turns Chloris into - the goddess of flowers.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 26 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Wed, Aug 19, 1998 (14:20) * 1 lines 
 
Stunning!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 27 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (11:07) * 8 lines 
 
And in a similar spirit...



Giovanni Bellini
'The Feast of the Gods'
1514
170cm x 188cm


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 28 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug 23, 1998 (07:21) * 8 lines 
 
Another big name from the Italian Renaissance is of course, Michelangelo. So, let's see what he did.



Michelangelo
1500's

I love Michelangelo's paintings of the creation, and ultimately, the Last Judgement for sheer skill and force, but they show God to be terrible I find. He shows God's majesty only, and not His fatherhood. Apparently he saw the world as irredeemable corrupt, and boy, does he show it or what??


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 29 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Mon, Aug 24, 1998 (21:51) * 1 lines 
 
Pretty daunting--he resembles one of the mythological gods.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 30 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 27, 1998 (06:44) * 9 lines 
 


Dieric Bouts (1420-1475)
'Mater Dolorosa'
1460
Oil on Panel

The Dutch Born painter, Dieric Bouts (c.1415-75) was appointed city painter in Louvain, Flanders in 1468. Although he is known as a Gothic painter, I think the great emotion in this one shows that he went along with the Renaissance. At first this painting seemed dreadfully kitschy to me, and then I thought: I am judging this picture by modern standards. So I looked again, and it became more remarkable for all the emotion depicted here. After the sternness of the Medieval and Gothic periods, this must
have been an almost shocking display of human qualities. What finally convinced me, was Mater Dolorosa's hands. These are working hands. They are dirty, because they are there to work and give and sacrifice, not to receive and be admired. Despite being a religious woman, she does not sit above the people around her. She sees their suffering, she feels it too.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 31 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sun, Aug 30, 1998 (15:44) * 1 lines 
 
Good point, Riette.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 32 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (01:15) * 1 lines 
 
°graciously accepting applause!°


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 33 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (06:52) * 7 lines 
 


Albrecht Altdorfer (c.1480-1538)
'View of the Danube Valley near Regensburg'
1520-25




 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 34 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Sep  1, 1998 (10:22) * 13 lines 
 
And here is a most stunning example:

Noli Me Tangere

Fra Angelico (c. 1395-1455)
'Noli Me Tangere'
1440-41
Fresco
Convent of San Marco, Florence

No wonder that in popular tradition this painter has been seen as, in Ruskin's words, 'not an artist properly so-called, but an inspired saint'.
The Frescos that he painted in San Marco are at once the expression of and a guide to the spiritual life and disciplined devotion of his convent community. The frescos were intended as aids to devotion; with their immaculate colouring, their economy in drawing and composition, and their freedom from the accidents of time and place, they attain a sense of blissful serenity.
Oh, and if any of you are interested in seeing it some time, the Convent of San Marco is now an Angelico museum.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 35 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep  1, 1998 (10:33) * 1 lines 
 
this is beautiful!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 36 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep  2, 1998 (01:06) * 1 lines 
 
Isn't it just? Looks so fresh too, like it was done yesterday.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 37 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Thu, Sep  3, 1998 (22:33) * 1 lines 
 
Absolutely, it's practically glowing.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 38 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (14:36) * 6 lines 
 
Winter Landscape

Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634)
'Winter Landscape'

This is the only work I have seen so far by this artist - I think. Apparently he was not only famous for his winter landscapes, but for the fact that he was deaf and dumb - they called him 'de Stomme van Kampen' (the mute of Kampen). Apparently there is an outstanding collection of his work at Windsor Castle.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 39 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (14:57) * 2 lines 
 
i think he capitalized on the senses he did have -- sight! look at the bright
sun shining down, it's blinding even here on the painting..


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 40 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep  7, 1998 (01:14) * 3 lines 
 
I know. I think it's beautiful!




 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 41 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Sep 18, 1998 (08:01) * 19 lines 
 
Let's go back to Fra Angelico, whose painting I posted two pictures ago.



Fra Angelico
'Presentation in the Temple'
1440-41
158cm x 136cm
Convent of San
Marco, Florence

Again, a very simple painting, but so beautifully done, one can't help but like it.

And for those of you who live in America, I've found out where you can
an go admire some of his other works.

'The Madonna of Humility': National Gallery of Art, Washington
'St James Freeing Hermogenes': Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
'Virgin and Child': Cincinnati Art Museum


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 42 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Fri, Sep 18, 1998 (16:57) * 3 lines 
 
The last time I was in the National Gallery, I got in trouble for pointing too closely at a painting. My girlfriend and I giggled through the whole East Wing.

This one seems unnatural and fakey-fake to me. Maybe I'm just jaded these days.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 43 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep 21, 1998 (21:47) * 2 lines 
 
Yes, I wonder why they're so stuck-up at galleries. I mean, do they honestly think one is going to DO something to the paintings???



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 44 of 93: wer  (KitchenManager) * Mon, Sep 21, 1998 (22:24) * 1 lines 
 
Well, you never know when a president is going to come by...


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 45 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep 21, 1998 (22:49) * 1 lines 
 
HA-HA!!!!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 46 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep 22, 1998 (21:30) * 4 lines 
 
that happened to me on an art trip in high school (no, not the president, gross!)
but i got a bit too close and the guard had to come over and make sure i wasn't
gonna fornicate the oil or something. it was really weird because i read the
"how to behave in an art gallery" rules and still wanted to touch the stuff.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 47 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (01:14) * 1 lines 
 
You mean you didn't know about the little magnets they put into paintings? Why do you think they attract to much money?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 48 of 93: Kristen Baker  (kristen) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (01:21) * 1 lines 
 
I saw most of these paintings in person. Nothing can describe them.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 49 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (01:55) * 3 lines 
 
I know what you mean, Kristen. I visit art museums and cathedrals wherever I go in Europe - it really does give one a kick to see famous works for real, rather than in books.
This weekend I saw some Giacometti stained glass windows in a church - they were stunning, probably among the most beautiful windows I've ever seen.
I also visited Stein am Rhein on Sunday, which is a small village on the river. It's so so beautiful, and all the buildings are COVERED in excellent paintings of village life.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 50 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (08:16) * 2 lines 
 
the city is trying to beautify some of the rundown places by painting various scenes on them.
the thing i can't figure out is if they're doing it so it feels safe....


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 51 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (13:36) * 3 lines 
 
Sounds a little dubious....

In Stein am Rhein at least you know it's for real, since there live a mere thousand people there! Maybe they did it to make the place seem more dangerous!!!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 52 of 93: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
Depends on what it's a picture of!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 53 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Sep 24, 1998 (01:22) * 1 lines 
 
Bread bakers, pig farmers - you know, the usual dangers.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 54 of 93: wer  (KitchenManager) * Thu, Sep 24, 1998 (09:24) * 1 lines 
 
only when you mess with their daughters...


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 55 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Sep 24, 1998 (10:07) * 1 lines 
 
pictures of butterflies and various bayou decidious wildlife....


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 56 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Sep 24, 1998 (10:32) * 1 lines 
 
like wolves?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 57 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Sep 24, 1998 (20:41) * 1 lines 
 
i think i'm the only wolf here, actually!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 58 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Sep 25, 1998 (01:15) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 59 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Sep 25, 1998 (13:09) * 1 lines 
 
eh? what was that, riette?? *grin*


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 60 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Sep 26, 1998 (00:40) * 2 lines 
 
mind strike!
For a moment I thought your species had become totally extinct here at the spring. Luckily I was wrong.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 61 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Dec  8, 1998 (17:52) * 7 lines 
 


Piero della Francesca
'The Baptism'
1442

I find the works by this artist incredibly serene and beautiful.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 62 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Dec  8, 1998 (18:03) * 9 lines 
 
Oops, that one didn't work - let's try another, and I'll try the previous one again later.



Montefeltro Altarpiece (Milan)
Piero della Francesca
1465

The most amazing thing about this painting is not only the brilliant perspective, but the dummy around the Child's neck!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 63 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Dec  8, 1998 (18:03) * 3 lines 
 
MAN!




 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 64 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Dec  8, 1998 (19:31) * 2 lines 
 
this picture is hilarious! i'm sorry but i can't help it. why do all the people's heads look like they were superimposed (like in enquire magazine)? and what's the matter with this baby? he can't be comfortable at all in a position like that. and what is that on his chest? a gaping chest wound or a cross hanging from a chain? and then there's the thing dangling from the scallop shell. it looks like a lamp or a big fat egg. now the clothing is very well done. looks like you can actually feel the folds o
his tunic. i don't mean to be ugly about the baby Jesus, but this picture is kind of weird looking to me.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 65 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (01:22) * 1 lines 
 
It's exquisitely painted, but yeah! I'm kind of puzzled by the dummy myself! There are much better pictures by this artist. His speciality was dimensions and perspective; he was one of the first artists who used architectual calculations to paint his pictures, and got it perfect. In that sense he is pretty brilliant. But that dummy!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 66 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
I was looking at the architecture, and thinking what a shame it is that they do not build buildings that way anymore.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 67 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
indeed! i must say that i enjoyed the architecture and the detailed way it was reproduced.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 68 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (18:51) * 2 lines 
 
I love walking through old courthouses, cathedrals, and other public buildings,
to look at the detailing.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 69 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (18:53) * 1 lines 
 
are you one of those too? where you visit a building and wind up walking around with your head at a 90 deg angle looking at the nooks and crannies on the ceiling? haha!!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 70 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
And wind up with a stiff neck that takes hours to get over? Yes!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 71 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (18:57) * 3 lines 
 
my problem is the whiplash affect from snapping that head back to level and up again to make sure i'm not running into anyone!

where're you from?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 72 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:11) * 2 lines 
 
Originally from the mid-west, I moved here from Nebraska, a little over two
years ago.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 73 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:12) * 1 lines 
 
moved here....where is here? i lived in kansas for 8 years. have been to nebraska--namely pioneer village.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 74 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:13) * 1 lines 
 
wait, i'm not still in kansas. am in louisiana.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 75 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:18) * 1 lines 
 
I live in Austin, Tx, for the present. I am taking a long look at Corpus, however.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 76 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:19) * 3 lines 
 
yeah, that would be a long look from way over in austin! *tongue in cheek*

whaddaya do?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 77 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:19) * 1 lines 
 
What part of Louisiana? Arcadiana, by any chance?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 78 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:23) * 1 lines 
 
no. shreveport/bossier.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 79 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:26) * 2 lines 
 
I am a regional truck driver. Used to work long-haul but got tired of it, and
you?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 80 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  9, 1998 (19:28) * 1 lines 
 
you're starting to sound a lot like someone i know.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 81 of 93: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Dec 10, 1998 (00:48) * 4 lines 
 
ha-ha!
Yeah, me too!

Are you into art, Patrick?


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 82 of 93: T Patrick McCourt  (PT) * Thu, Dec 10, 1998 (01:25) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, I am. I enjoy most forms of art.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 83 of 93: Marcia   (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  9, 2000 (23:27) * 15 lines 
 
Contributed by John Burnett

Hawaii TV news anchor Joe Moore told a terrific story about the painting of
Leonardo DaVinci's "The Last Supper." DaVinci used live models as Jesus and
the 12 disciples. The first person he painted was Jesus. After several
months of searching for a "face without sin," he settled on a 19-year-old
youth as the face of the Messiah. Six years later, all the disciples but
Judas Iscariot were painted. He also spent a considerable amount of time
before settling on a 25-year-old convict to be the face of the disciple who
had betrayed Christ. It wasn't until the painting was completed that
DaVinci was told that the person who had posed as Judas was the same person
who had also posed as Jesus.





 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 84 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Feb 10, 2000 (12:15) * 1 lines 
 
incredible!


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 85 of 93: Marcia   (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb 10, 2000 (12:28) * 1 lines 
 
It is a real chicken-skin story. Who says corruption does not tell on the face of the perpetrator?! Not all of us have a Dorian Gray portrait in the attic.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 86 of 93: Diane Lund  (DianeLund) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (07:34) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 87 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (21:57) * 3 lines 
 
Http://tvm.tigtail.org/TVM/L_View/X1/a.Early%20Italian/botticelli/M/botticelli_young_man.jpg

you can see what diane is posting by pasting the above url in your browser.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 88 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (21:57) * 1 lines 
 
(although, diane, i didn't get the picture, but the museum's homepage)


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 89 of 93: Marcia   (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (23:24) * 1 lines 
 
No, I didn't get the picture either - oh Wolfie we will never get to see this young man. Bet he was magnificent. checking your url...too...


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 90 of 93: Diane Lund  (DianeLund) * Sun, Jul 15, 2001 (02:15) * 1 lines 
 
yeah..well it just doesn't seem to work, but it is one of my favourite Botticelli-pics (I'm in to portraits).


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 91 of 93: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Jul 15, 2001 (16:18) * 1 lines 
 
portraits always make me wonder if that's what the individual really looked like. you know, did they tell their painter, oh, leave that part off, or fix my nose or something! i do like portraits and also imagine what these people were like.


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 92 of 93: Diane Lund  (DianeLund) * Sun, Jul 15, 2001 (16:27) * 4 lines 
 
(Wolf)i do like portraits and also imagine what these people were like.
Exactly!!
But you're right about the uncertainty of how alike the portrait and original is/were.
I guess important people in particular would want to change one or two things about how the future would remember them;o)


 Topic 18 of 55 [art]: The Italian Renaissance
 Response 93 of 93: Diane Lund  (DianeLund) * Sun, Jul 15, 2001 (16:28) * 1 lines 
 
damn!! My grammar isn't that good this evening... were=was...

Prev topicNext topicHelp

art gallery Main Menu
Art Planet Icon