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Topic 3 of 64: growth and the environment

Thu, Nov 14, 1996 (21:26) | Paul Terry Walhus (terry)
Austin is the second fastest growing city in the US. How does it feel
to be second fiddle to Las Vegas?

Well, if your idea of Austin is sitting in the beer garden at the
Armadillo World HQ then you may not be too crazy about all this
growth. But the AWQ has been bulldozed for a high rise so we have to
deal with it.

How do you feel about Austin's explosive growth. Will it destroy the
natural beauty of this gorgeous place? Can we grow *and* preserve
our environment? How? And who's going to protect our precious natural
resources?
22 responses total.

 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 1 of 22: aubrey  (aubrey) * Tue, Apr  8, 1997 (13:55) * 2 lines 
 
I could hardly bear to read the papers in Austin for all the raping of Barton Springs that was going on while I was there--worse things happen here in Dallas, but for some reason it means more when it happens to my beloved Austin. I have to shut my eyes driving into town from I35 (good thing I'm not usually the driver!) because all those apartments where there once were fields just tears me in two. And that straightening out 2222--what's up with that? make it a straight shot for the drunken boaters? I
say let them take themselves out of the gene pool!!! Seriously, the growth is cancerous, but like you say, necessary in some ways. Just wish it weren't so violent (Barton Spgs, I mean).


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 2 of 22: aubrey  (aubrey) * Wed, Apr  9, 1997 (12:51) * 3 lines 
 
I'm writing too many responses I know, but on the way home from work I was so assaulted by the ugliness of Dallas building I had to write again: There was an empty lot behind where I live, which a developer purchased. I happened to be home the afternoon they bulldozed the trees--in all my reading about tree-hugging environmentalists (the ones in England who set up house in the treetops to prevent their destruction) I never got the full visceral impact of trees being uprooted via huge caterpillar machin
s. I could hardly breathe and finally had to leave my house so as not to witness any more violence--I hate to be hyperbolic, but it really looked like a rape. And on my drive home yesterday, I saw this other place where they've knocked down all these great wood frame homes over about a 3 X 4 block area...and you know it never even occurred to me they would do the same to the trees. I'm just that oblivious to man's inhumanity to Mother Earth. These enormous, 30-year-old oaks and elms were felled, roots
pointing skyward and I'm going to have to stop here because I'm too upset to go on. But that's where I am right now. More people, more scars upon the land (a quote from my John Denver days).


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 3 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Wed, Nov 11, 1998 (11:54) * 1 lines 
 
We really need to get together and come up with a plan for continued growth. If we don't, something is sure to blindside us, and then it'll be too late.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 4 of 22: Leplep le Plep  (jgross) * Fri, Nov 13, 1998 (00:44) * 8 lines 
 
If the Austin community is what is meant by "we", maybe we've already
come up with a plan for continued growth.
So what is it, if we have?
Or how do we find out something like that?
And how do you (anyone reading this) feel about grassroots change?
And how do you get involved, if you have the motivation?
How do you make it be not a waste of time or fortitude or naivete or heart?



 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 5 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Sun, Nov 15, 1998 (10:14) * 2 lines 
 
All good questions. I wish I had the answers to them. I believe in grassroots change. I personally believe that, all the green areas within the city limits should not be developed. I also believe that private cars should be banned in the area between Cameron/Dessau rd and Mopac, between Parmer and Ben White. I feel that this would do wonders for our air quality. not to mention saving a couple of lives each year. It is a fact of life that the drivers of Austin lack the skill and intelligence to adequately
perate motor vehicles in a congested city environment. I attribute this to the influx of Californians in the mid eighties, since most Texans have common sense in abundance.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 6 of 22: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Mon, Nov 16, 1998 (14:49) * 5 lines 
 
I hate hearing negative growth attributed to a particular group of people especially a grouping so vague and non-binding in some cases as what state people hail from.
As a Texan living in Colorado (and loving it!) the stereotyping is insane and predominatly false.

I am sure I get your drift however, there are certainly numerous Californians with common sense who also abhor city growth and overpopulation as much as you or I.
(not usually this bitchy, just a nerve there!)


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 7 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Mon, Nov 16, 1998 (20:15) * 2 lines 
 
When was the last time you were In San Diego, LA, Bakersfield, Fresno, Sacramento, Truckee, Susanville, San Francisco, Barstow, Squaw Valley? Yes, there are people, in California, that have common sense, but, for the most part, these people live north of Sacramento, and they have real roots. They don't pack up and leave to live somewhere else. The great majority of Californians that leave the state, come from one of the mentioned cities, They have a way of looking at things that is completely foreign to a
ybody else. And the attitudes that are prevalent among these people, were not present in Texas prior to the great influx of Californians in the early eighties.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 8 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Mon, Nov 16, 1998 (20:19) * 1 lines 
 
And God help us if the people coming here, right now, from Boston, ever start driving like they do in Boston.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 9 of 22: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (09:25) * 8 lines 
 
I LOVE SAN DIEGO (was there 11 months ago)
San Francisco (there a year and a half ago)
never in the other places.
as far as I could tell, the people who were most 'foreign' to me were the ones that had completely embraced the lifestyle of the aforementioned cities and they certainly weren't looking to go anywhere else.
THe people that I know hailing from California most recently have also had 'roots' in several other states. They are bringing in a wealth of different viewpoints, some of which I agree with and some of which I don't agree with.
I still believe it is unfair (and ignorant) to blame negative social growth and development on a particular group of people. Many changes are subtle and certainly the types of changes are vastly different.
Are we talking about traffic, or building growth, or same sex marriage or saving the springs??? All of these are relatively new ideas (last fifty years) and certainly one group can not take all the blame nor credit for any of these ideas. Especially not one group bound only by physical location at one time or another.
(ramble, ramble, ramble)


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 10 of 22: Leplep le Plep  (jgross) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (10:56) * 10 lines 
 
I came from Namibia, California, which is south of Sacramento,
and I still drive on the left side of the road.
The interstate gets tricky around 5:00 p.m.
I like it, cuz I get to meet my fellow drivers that way.
They stick their heads out and talk to me.
They're really nice, and they've helped me feel more at home here in Austin.
It's incredible how different their points of view are from my own,
but I like how willing they are to share.
I just regret we don't have more time to talk.
Havin' only one regret isn't very many, though---cool, huh....?


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 11 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (11:17) * 3 lines 
 
Actually I was talking about attitude more than anything else. Early on Saturday Nov. 7th, I was bringing a fully loaded 18 wheeler up from San Antonio. It was raining pretty hard, and traffic was light. It was 330 AM. I had to move over into the center lane, just after passing the Slaughter Lane exit. I was going 55, which is the night speed limit for large trucks in Texas. There was a car coming up fast in that lane, but he was half a mile behind me when I started over. He completely ignored my signal,
nd nearly hit the rear of my trailer. Then, he zoomed around me, cut in front of me, and slammed on his brakes. There was no way I could stop. At that speed, fully loaded, on wet pavement, it takes me one and a half miles to stop. He was driving a Toyota Paseo. not a very big car. Luckily, he had an attack of common sense, and right after hitting his brakes, he took off. I was so close to him, that I could only see half his car. the nose of the truck hid the rest. I would estimate, I was within two inche
of his bumper. Throughout this time the left lane was completely open. If he had not gassed on it. I'd have spread him across the interstate like jelly on toast. With him that close, I could not avoid him on wet pavement. This is the kind of idiocy that is common to California, and wasn't common here until the late Eighties.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 12 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (11:26) * 1 lines 
 
When an eighteen wheeler is fully loaded, it weighs 40 tons. The easiest way to get a feel for this is: When a car broadsides the locomotive of a moving train, the train scatters pieces of car for a ways down the track. When a loaded eighteen wheeler hits the locomotive of a moving train, it derails the entire train.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 13 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (11:35) * 1 lines 
 
Definition of Californian: a person that spent the majority of their childhood in California, or One that has lived there for 15 years or more. At least that is what I mean when I say Californian.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 14 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (11:55) * 2 lines 
 
I apologize for thinking that you knew nothing of California. I spent 3 years there in the army, mostly TDY. I do not think of the local inhabitants of California (southern) as US citizens. Some of them I'm not even sure are human.
Most people who were in the army with me feel the same way. I could go on and on about the stupid laws, eccentric petty functionaries, etc. It would be a great place to live if we could drop a couple of neutron bombs and sanitize it first. I am not normally a prejudiced person, I am, however, extremely prejudiced against Californians.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 15 of 22: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (14:11) * 2 lines 
 
i tend to be prejudice against people who overgeneralize.
(glad the wet pavement incident didn't turn catastrophic, are you betting he was from CA?) *smile*


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 16 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (17:06) * 1 lines 
 
I think that I'm getting too predictable on this.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 17 of 22: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (17:14) * 1 lines 
 
time to eat the food in the proverbial food fight, eh?


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 18 of 22: Tim Guenther  (TIM) * Tue, Nov 17, 1998 (19:23) * 1 lines 
 
Yup. Sometimes you have no choice. I think I'll check out that site and see what they are throwing now.


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 19 of 22: yes (tami) * Mon, Nov 23, 1998 (11:17) * 1 lines 
 
Why do all the conversations here keep returning to food?


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 20 of 22: wer  (KitchenManager) * Mon, Dec 14, 1998 (23:48) * 7 lines 
 
Tami:

Food's a socially acceptable form of sensual
instant gratification, is my guess...


(I'm prejudiced against stupid people...)


 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 21 of 22: austin spring (sprin5) * Fri, Mar  2, 2001 (10:07) * 11 lines 
 
HerHere's a fine insightful piece by Lindsey Eck, a writer, composer, musician who lives in Central Texas.

http://eserver.org/bs/50/eck.html

An excerpt:

"Historically, economic boom times bring florescence in music and the arts, whether in the Florence of the Medici, Habsburg Vienna, or the France of Louis XIV. Everywhere, that is, other than fin-de-siècle America, where our uniquely philistine upper class seems to prefer the uniformity of the subdivision to the chaos of bohemia. The upper classes' loyalty to the bourgeois ethic of the party of Jesse Helms and high-tech prosperity has meant lowlife for artists and musicians priced out of living, studio, and rehearsal space from the Big Dig to the Golden Gate. In an irony now so familiar as to be reflexive, young professionals lured by the charm of a boho district wind up crowding out the very nonconformists who gave the neighborhood its character. Apologists for "development" (often mere construction) like to shrug the process off as the result of the invisible hand of the marketplace. But sometimes the hand is all too visible, as newer, conservative residents use zoning and noise restrictions, enforced by
eighborhood associations or sympathetic police, to harass artists and other nonconformists, perhaps driven by an inchoate fear of what is different.

read the rest at http://eserver.org/bs/50/eck.html



 Topic 3 of 64 [austin]: growth and the environment
 Response 22 of 22: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Apr 30, 2001 (05:44) * 1 lines 
 
The guy can write very well, and at length! Wish he would join us here.

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