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Topic 3 of 69: Emma

Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (09:04) | Stefanie Miller (Stefanie)
HAs anyone heard any new news on the new Emma since we last convened?

153 responses total.

 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 1 of 153: Amy Bellinger  (Amy) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (09:13) * 7 lines 
 
Oh, so we all can create new topics. Good.

Stefanie, you saw my remarks on the 5-minute A&E promo? Has anyone else seen it?

My 7 year old did and very solemly informed me that he had learned of a new movie he knew I would like.

Amy


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 2 of 153: Stefanie Miller  (Stefanie) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (09:16) * 3 lines 
 
Amy, I don't think I did see your remarks on the new promo. What was it like?

Stefanie


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 3 of 153: Laura M  (LauraM) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (11:08) * 1 lines 
 
Hi I finally found this place. I did see the 5 minute teaser regarding the A&E EMMA, I'm quite afraid that I don't like the person playing Mr Knightley


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 4 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (11:30) * 1 lines 
 
I agree Laura M. He doesn't look to "hot"


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 5 of 153: Bernie Parkin  (Bernie) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (11:53) * 1 lines 
 
I will be watching it this Sunday. I'll definitely make sure that it gets taped!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 6 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (13:58) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Bernie! Please give us a full review!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 7 of 153: Stefanie Miller  (Stefanie) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (14:29) * 3 lines 
 
From what I've seen on the net of Mr. Knightly, I'd have to agree with Donna. It seems that he is closer to a Mr. Collins than a Mr. Darcy.

Stefanie


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 8 of 153: Rebecca Davey  (Becks) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
He's a dog, girls!!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 9 of 153: mich  (mich) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (16:26) * 7 lines 
 
First of all I must say I agree with Rebecca but...

For those of us who had not seen Colin Firth before P&P, would we have thought him "hot" only seeing a promo picture.
I cannot honestly answer since I admire him more and more everytime I watch Mr.Darcy give Lizzie the look.

I can only say I did not notice him in Circle of friends or Secret Garden. Now I rent them just to catch a glimpse.
What are your thoughts?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 10 of 153: Kali   (Kali) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (17:20) * 3 lines 
 
Mich, Arnessa and I discussed this last night...we decided it was a combination of his acting talent and the role of Darcy that made him attractive in P&P...not to mention the way wardrobe and makeup cleaned him up...

- K


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 11 of 153: michalene smith  (mich) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (17:45) * 4 lines 
 
Kail,
But if you had only seen a picture of Firth in a trailer for P&P would you have thought him attractive?
After seeing the picture of Mr.Knightly (A&E) we all seem to think the guy rather...unattractive.
Could he have the same presence as Firth on screen and we will think differently of him later?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 12 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (17:49) * 1 lines 
 
Let us hope so, Mich. Waiting breathlessly for Bernie's review...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 13 of 153: Ian Davey  (geekman) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (19:04) * 2 lines 
 
G'day, As the movie version of "Emma" has only recently started screening here in Oz I was dismayed to see there was a series being made. So soon, albeit too soon can only lead to unfavourable comparisons. Perhaps Jeremy Northam should have been picked for the role again? Our media says we are "Austened-out!" I suggest in the meantime go and see "Shine". It's totally different and maybe very confronting but the piano playing is sublime.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 14 of 153: kathleen elder  (kathleen) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (20:12) * 13 lines 
 
Austened-out?! I am all astonishment! I suppose that non-Austeniens could get
weary of all the Austen adaptations, but I plan to see them all as many times as
possible -- in the theater, and on video as soon as available.

As to Mr Knightly, I think we must suspend judgment until we see the latest
version. While Jeremy Northam is gorgeous, I am quite certain my heart can be
won by a worthy character. (Prior to seeing Sense & Sensibility I would not
have assumed that Alan Rickman would make Col. Brandon so much more attractive
than Willoughby, but it worked.) A good actor, a good director, a good part --
and of course a marvelously good story.

When it comes to Jane Austen, I always want more. Even if it's just a new version of Emma!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 15 of 153: Ann  (haker) * Fri, Nov 22, 1996 (23:27) * 1 lines 
 
If you like Alan Rickman, and tear-jerkers, see Truly, Madly, Deeply. It's a wonderful film from the director of the English Patient and starring Emma's Mrs. Elton (Juliet Stevenson).


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 16 of 153: kathleen elder  (kathleen) * Sat, Nov 23, 1996 (08:20) * 2 lines 
 
Ann -- I recently purchased Truly, Madly, Deeply and I've started the video. I enjoy Juliet Stevenson, even though she's not doing comedy here. And I am certain I shall enjoy Alan Rickman as soon as he comes in for a longer appearance. Now, if I could just stay awake 23 hours a day to see, read, and compute everything I want/need to do!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 17 of 153: Ian Davey  (geekman) * Sun, Nov 24, 1996 (04:05) * 8 lines 
 
Now something completely different. How about the "Three Degrees of Alan Rickman"?

]Austened-out?! I am all astonishment! I suppose that non-Austeniens could get
]weary of all the Austen adaptations, but I plan to see them all as many times ]as possible -- in the theater, and on video as soon as available.

Kathleen: Well this fanatic isn't but I suppose most Australians are. It took the second screening of P&P2 before people were clammouring for more. Then Sense & Sensibility and Persuasion came on at the same time, and more recently Emma. I for one though look forward to the series. Bernie I would be interested in your review too so I can tell Ostentatious Jane about it.

Alan Rickman made a good villian in Die Hard II.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 18 of 153: kathleen elder  (kathleen) * Sun, Nov 24, 1996 (14:00) * 4 lines 
 
Ian -- I agree w/ your assessment of Mr. Rickman as Hans Gruber in Die Hard. I do not usually watch action movies, and I do not especially like Bruce Willis, but I rented this movie and fast forwarded through all the parts w/o Alan Rickman. My friends laugh at me, but they have their quirks too!

So, where in Rosings Park will you be lurking next? Pray, tell us if you spot Lizzie or Darcy.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 19 of 153: Amy Bellinger  (Amy) * Sun, Nov 24, 1996 (19:30) * 9 lines 
 
Bernie!!!!!!

Full report if you please. You want questions? Would that be an easier way for you to satisfy our curiousity?

I will start: does Knightly grow on you?

Comment on casting of Frank, Jane, Miss Bates, Isabelle, Mr Elton. I already know I am going to love Emma and Mrs Weston and I have to believe that Knightley has something going for him because our producers know what they are doing.




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 20 of 153: Bernie  (Bernie) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (15:23) * 118 lines 
 

Once more into the breeches...



I was reading an article (on the train on my way home) previewing the
two rival costume dramas — BBC's "Tenant of Wildfell Hall" and
ITV's "Emma". I thought you might be interested in what they
said.



"So, with memories of Colin Firth's Mr. Darcy still warm
in many a bosom, we are in for another procession of gels in Regency frocks
escorted by eligible bucks in riding boots.....So, two rival costume dramas
vying for the viewes's eye : which is the more pleasing ? Opinions may
depend on what we must call theDarcy Factor.



"For all its multitude of merits, the BBC's P&P has created
an unreasonable demand among the nation's women for men in mysterious trousers.
Indeed, the day may not be far off when the prime requiremennt of any classic
drama will be not so much fidelity to the text but the presence of a hero
with all the necessary basic attributes : hot–coal eyes (betraying
the unseen blaze in the Aga double–oven of his breast), hair curly–going–on–tousled and thighs that can grip a mettlesome mare like a denture–fixative."



I was sitting with a very large cheesy grin by this time! Needless
to say, I received some very strange looks.



"In this regard, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall has the edge
on Emma. It has Toby Stephens and Rupert Graves. It is Graves who
comes nearest to the Darcy mould but, alas, he is the villain...Emma
is a much prettier affair but rates a much lower reading on the Darcy meter.
Mark Strong is a perfectly convincing Mr. Knightley but he is probably
too sweet for viewers who prefer their heroes to indulge in occasional
outbreaks of nostril–flaring and boot–thwacking. As the rakish
dandy Frank Churchill, Raymond Coulthard's smile puts one in mind of a
piranha doing a Colgate toothpaste commercial."



(Excerpts from EVENING STANDARD.)



So, I will now give you my opinion on both these dramas. I know most
of you are eagerly awaiting Emma, but in my opinion if you get the chance
to see "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall", then do so. (It is a coproduction
between the BBC, CBC and WGBH Boston).



Starting with Emma. Since I am a JA fan, I knew straight away
that I was going to enjoy this production. After watching it, my first
reaction was 2 hours and 5 minutes (inclusive of all commercial breaks)
wasn't long enough to do justice to JA's story — oh, for a 5 hour BBC serialisation!
(Then again I didn't think 5 hours of P&P was long enough!). Part of
the irriatation was the fact that there were so many commercial breaks
— 5 in all — which tended to jar the continuitiy of the story. Due to the
time constraint, the film tended to jump from major incident to major incident,
thus cutting some of the finer nuances of the story, and as a result, you
didn't get the same impression of character development as you did in P&P.



This much said, although I didn't enjoy Emma as much as P&P, I rate
it at least as highly as the 2 hour version of "Persuasion".
(On a sliding scale I'd give P&P2 10 and Emma 8.5/9).
I thought Kate Bekinsale's portrayal of Emma was excellent — a much more
down to earth version than Gwynneth Paltrow's Emma, which seemed to verge
on frivolity at times. Mark Strong's Knightley, though not as handsome
as Jeremy Northam's, grew on you as the film progressed — similar in effect
to Ciaran Hinds' Capt. Wentworth. You really do feel for him when he knows
he's in love with Emma and yearns for her love in return, yet he feels
that she is in love with the undeserving Frank. The scenes where Knightley
chastises Emma for her various follies/indiscretions are very well acted.
He was especially forceful in the scene where he berates Emma for her callous
treatment of Miss Bates — Emma was most heartily sorry.



The supporting cast contained a number of well known faces. Bernard
Hepton (Sir Thomas Bertram in Mansfield Park) as Mr. Woodhouse, Samantha
Bond (Maria Bertram in MP) as Mrs. Weston, and Prunella Scales (Sybil Fawlty)
as the garrilous Miss Bates. All played their parts with the necessary
aplomb. Dominic Rowan depicts Mr. Elton as an egotistcal, hypocritical,
ingratiating "sleazeball" (whose primary mission in life in the
first third of the film is to get himself a rich wife). Upon marriage to
the ubiquitous Mrs. E, he subsides to a degree of aloofness, which I don't
recall in the book — I always took him to be invariably rude and boorish.
Mrs. E portrayed by Lucy Robinson (Mrs. Hurst) is a real hoot. I know that
she is meant to have a West Country accent (coming from Bristol) but Lucy's
Mrs. E sometimes appeared to come from over the Atlantic! I laughed so
much whenever she said anything. Finally, Raymond Coulthard's handsome,
blonde Frank Churchill was as much of the fop as I expected him to be,
although sometimes that smile of his did grate on my nerves. The description
of the Colgate advert (See above) is spot on.



On the musical score, several duets are sung. Frank, in my opinion has
a very good voice. Both Jane and Emma play the piano tolerably well — Jane
better than Emma of course. The music scores chosen for the dances in Emma
are far less jolly than in P&P and the incidental music in general
wasn't as emotive as in P&P2.



Darcy factor 8 for Mark Strong and 8 for Raymond Coulthard.



One down one to go. (I promise, I will make this shorter!). Moving to
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, this is a much darker novel dealing
with such topics as abandonment, rape and repression. Tara Fitzgerald's
portrayal as the much maligned Helen Graham/Huntingdon is superb. Toby
Stephens' Gilbert Markham (a Yorkshire farmer who slowly falls in love
with the mysterious Tenant of Wildfell Hall [aka Helen] and feels
that his love is never to be requited) is played with much feeling — both
passion , understanding and consuming hatred — and complements Tara's enforced
aloofness very well. Finally, Rupert Graves plays Arthur Huntington, the
villain of the piece. Here is a man, who upon marrying Helen, is perpetually
drunk, dallies with his friends' sisters — in front of Helen no less —,
treats his wife with contempt, and after the birth of their son makes a
virtual prisoner of his wife in their home. Rupert Graves is dark, brooding
and handsome and I think many a young lady will feel that his performance
is on a par with Colin Firth's. For me though, Huntington a thouroughly
base character, whom I never could get to like, will not supplant Colin
Firth's brilliant Darcy!



Darcy factor 9 for Rupert Graves and 8 for Toby Stephens.



There you have it. I had a vastly enjoyable Sunday evening and I hope
I have whetted your appetites somewhat, leaving you wanting to know more.....



Bernie



PS. Amy, regarding possible contributions/bribes as payment for your
efforts at providing the BB, the best I can come up with is a copy of "The
making of Emma" complete with Andrew Davies' screenplay.




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 21 of 153: Inko  (Inko) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (16:13) * 3 lines 
 
Bernie, Thank you so much for your very complete review and the article from the Standard. I loved the article - I remember seeing similar stories last summer in England when they were still filming Emma. In one Andrew Davies commented on the wonderbra effect of the regency dresses, which he seemed to like.

By your reviews, I think I just might have to get a back-up set of P&P2, since I am liable to wear the one I have out from daily viewing. I'm looking forward to Emma, though. I think Tenant might only come here next season - it wasn't listed on Masterpiece Theatre for this season, but maybe in late spring.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 22 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (16:57) * 1 lines 
 
Bernie, thank you for the wonderful review- can't wait to see it! I feel compelled, however to comment upon your complaint of having 5 commercial breaks in the course of 2 hrs, 5 min. You do not realize it , but you are most fortunate indeed. Here in the US we feel ourselves lucky to have only 5 commercials in one hour! I am sorely afraid that A&E will be snipping scenes again in order to fit in more adverts.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 23 of 153: Arnessa M. Garrett  (arnessa) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (18:49) * 4 lines 
 
Thanks bunches, Bernie. I can't wait to see the new Emma. You've done
more than whet my appetite. I promise to watch the Tenant of Wildfell Hall,
too. That newspaper review is classic. Those thighs! Is that the magic
ingredient that makes Darcy so (ahhh!) irresistible, after all?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 24 of 153: Joan, too  (jwinsor) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks so much Bernie - now we are all, indeed, eager to be savoring such delights!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 25 of 153: Candace  (candace) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (23:00) * 2 lines 
 
"...Thighs that can grip a meddlesome mare like a denture-fixative"??? Giddyup, indeed!!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 26 of 153: Rebecca Davey  (Becks) * Mon, Nov 25, 1996 (23:28) * 1 lines 
 
You are wonderful, Berniie? Does anybody have any idea when "The Tenant.." will air here in N.A.?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 27 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Tue, Nov 26, 1996 (09:28) * 3 lines 
 
Cheryl you are right. What could they possibly cut out of two hours. They will ruin Emma. Inko I hope we don't have to wait too long for Tenant,I think we should email PBS to find out when it will be on.

Well done Bernie, I can't wait


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 28 of 153: Bernie  (Bernie) * Tue, Nov 26, 1996 (13:32) * 9 lines 
 
Cheryl, I know I should count myself lucky. When I was in the States, I was constantly vexed by the frequency of ad's.

Since I have a copy of the Screenplay, I'm going to watch Emma again this weekend to see if any of the scenes were cut. I will report back in due course.

By the way if any of you are interested in the "Making of Emma" book I'll be more than happy to supply details.

I'll be away for the rest of the week at a Conference in Harrogate (more JA connections) — so will be suffering from severe withdrawl symptoms.

See you all next week.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 29 of 153: Bernie  (Bernie) * Tue, Nov 26, 1996 (13:47) * 9 lines 
 
Cheryl, I know I should count myself lucky. When I was in the States, I was constantly vexed by the frequency of ad's.

Since I have a copy of the Screenplay, I'm going to watch Emma again this weekend to see if any of the scenes were cut. I will report back in due course.

By the way if any of you are interested in the "Making of Emma" book I'll be more than happy to supply details.

I'll be away for the rest of the week at a Conference in Harrogate (more JA connections) — so will be suffering from severe withdrawl symptoms.

See you all next week.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 30 of 153: Joan, too  (jwinsor) * Tue, Nov 26, 1996 (23:42) * 5 lines 
 
] Bernie:
] By the way if any of you are interested in the "Making of Emma" book I'll be more than happy to supply details.


Please do, Bernie!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 31 of 153: Ingrid Gordon  (Inko) * Wed, Nov 27, 1996 (16:29) * 1 lines 
 
Please Bernie - I'd love to have the details of the Making of Emma book, and where it's available - in England, U.S., or Internet. Thanks


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 32 of 153: Hilary Talbot  (Hilary) * Thu, Nov 28, 1996 (14:15) * 1 lines 
 
Enjoyed the review, thanks Bernie. I saw the film 'Emma' yesterday! Got some catching up to do in Australia!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 33 of 153: Ann  (Ann) * Sun, Dec  1, 1996 (23:18) * 1 lines 
 
So the screenplay for Davies' Emma is available but not P&P2. It's not fair!!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 34 of 153: Ann Rydberg  (Ann2) * Mon, Dec  2, 1996 (09:14) * 12 lines 
 
Thanks a lot Bernie. OOh I can understand your peculiar face and the effect it had on your fellow passengers, hot-coal eyes and that bit about dentive-fixa-
tive, I just gasp and sigh.
The entire article is nourishing for I know not how long I will have to wait for
for it, ITV Emma that is.
Have a comment on the film with Jeremy if you are still interested in him
and Gwyneth!?
Comparision of Mr B:s Maggot in P&P2 and EMMA
As I saw Emma a few days ago, I shall keep to that version. I thought it was so light and full of grace to illustrate how Mr Knightley, - for the first time? - allowed himself to be in love and regard Emma as a grownup equal whom he was permitted to consider a woman and not his little sister. (No indeed not)
And Emma responded to that joyfully and tender still unconscious of her heart. In this version the maggot was a relief whereas in P&P2 it is so full of tension.
It was a deligthful surprise to me that it was in the film at all. I quite startled and for a few seconds could not place the music.
Ann2



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 35 of 153: Elaine  (Elaine) * Wed, Dec  4, 1996 (08:29) * 1 lines 
 
The A&E WEB sight currently features the BEHIND THE SCENES of the making of EMMA, similiar to P&P2 where actors, director, scene writer are interviewed.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 36 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Wed, Dec  4, 1996 (13:04) * 1 lines 
 
Does anyone know when they are broadcasting this behind the scenes stuff? I'd like to see it, but I don't have time to watch A&E all day inthe hopes of catching it! It would take too much time away from the chat room!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 37 of 153: Amy Bellinger  (Amy) * Wed, Dec  4, 1996 (14:56) * 7 lines 
 
]too much time away from the chat room!
__
Cheryl, you are too funny (and pathetic!)

The one time I saw it was just before 8 am on a weekday. Since classroom does not have commercials, there's time then. I don't know when else the schedule would permit. Maybe other times when there are not so many commercials? Mid-day? I don't know.




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 38 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Wed, Dec 18, 1996 (13:30) * 1 lines 
 
I just saw the long Promo the on Sunday before/after Biography/also a shorter promo. They are also running "Specials" ad. Included in this promo are scenes from P&P2 in a kaildescope type fashion. They go by very fast. What was announced is that "Specials" will be on every Sunday at 8:00 and repeated at 12:00. The kids let me know when the promos are on. Airs Sunday Feb. 16th.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 39 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Wed, Jan  1, 1997 (14:58) * 1 lines 
 
Hope I'm not too off-topic, but does anyone know if the Gwenyth Paltrow version of EMMA has been released on videotape? I've been trying to find it, but don't know if it isn't out yet, or whether I just got caught in the New Year's video rush. Thanks.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 40 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Wed, Jan  1, 1997 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
re: Emma on video, I don't think so, Amy2. Surely someone would have said something about it? That stuff is never off topic here. Dont' ever worry about that.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 41 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Wed, Jan  1, 1997 (16:25) * 1 lines 
 
http://www.tbvg.com/ scroll down to March or April you'll see The English Patient and Emma. "Whatever" is the most hated word of 1996 uh. I just read this on my news file. Whatever?. This is my favorite word. Whateverrrr.LOL.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 42 of 153: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Jan  1, 1997 (17:44) * 5 lines 
 
They have t shirts at BookPeople that say

Whatever




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 43 of 153: Kathleen Grant  (Kaffeine) * Wed, Jan  1, 1997 (22:34) * 1 lines 
 
The Jeremy Northam EMMA is scheduled to be released on video in March.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 44 of 153: Jane   (jane) * Thu, Jan  2, 1997 (12:04) * 2 lines 
 
Kathleen, LOL! The Jeremy Northam version, indeed. I wonder why they just didn't call it "Mr. Knightley" instead of "Emma."
Jane


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 45 of 153: Mari Topitzes  (Mari) * Thu, Jan  2, 1997 (16:08) * 3 lines 
 
Jane, ''The Jeremy Northam version, indeed. I wonder why they just didn't call it 'Mr. Knightley' instead of 'Emma.'

Or ''Darcy's Pride'' instead of P&P....


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 46 of 153: genie estes  (genie) * Thu, Jan  9, 1997 (17:39) * 1 lines 
 
Just got a copy of my Critics' Choice video catalog and on the back cover is Emma, the A&E version, for only $14.77. Since I don't have cable tv, I was not aware that Emma2 has been broadcast already. I knew it was on the books somewhere, but...How is it that the tape is available so soon? How was it received by audiences in general, that is those without the discerning taste of present company? If anyone is interested, the number for Critics Choice video is:1-800-367-7765.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 47 of 153: Ann  (Ann) * Thu, Jan  9, 1997 (19:09) * 1 lines 
 
Critics Choice (1-800-367-7765) also has Valmont ($10.77), The Advocate ($14.77) Hostages ($14.95), and if you really want to watch the movie Firth has disowned: Playmaker ($14.95).


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 48 of 153: mich  (mich) * Fri, Jan 10, 1997 (10:38) * 2 lines 
 
I beg you don't spend your hard earned money on the Playmaker, rent it.
Mich


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 49 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Fri, Jan 10, 1997 (11:55) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Mich,Valmont is my pick.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 50 of 153: Carol Schachner  (carolee) * Fri, Jan 10, 1997 (23:31) * 3 lines 
 
Genie EMMA is being broadcast on A&E here ( at least in California) on Feb.16th but has already aired on BBC in England. Maybe that's why the tape is already available.

Donna, good choice. I loooove CF in VALMONT too.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 51 of 153: Joan, too  (jwinsor) * Sat, Jan 11, 1997 (01:02) * 3 lines 
 
Genie EMMA is being broadcast on A&E here ( at least in California) on Feb.16th

Did someone not say that the video would not be shipped till 2/17?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 52 of 153: Carol Schachner  (carolee) * Sun, Jan 12, 1997 (02:09) * 1 lines 
 
Joan, I read that too. I just got the catalog and will try to order today. I'll post what happens.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 53 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Sun, Jan 12, 1997 (09:13) * 1 lines 
 
According to the A&E Biography {new name was A&E Monthly} you may order now,but it won't be deliver until Feb.delivery.Allow 3 to 4 weeks delivery. For fast delivery,call 1-800-828-6565,for free catalog,Write: A&E Home Video,Box HV1,235 E. 45th Street,NY,NY 10017


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 54 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Mon, Jan 13, 1997 (12:17) * 1 lines 
 
Just saw the Paltrow EMMA yesterday & liked it very much. I can't say this version was particularly true to Austen -- in fact, it played more like Sheridan to my mind. But it was generally pleasant & not offensive. I thought Paltrow did very well for a young (not-Brit) actress.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 55 of 153: Hilary Talbot  (Hilary) * Mon, Jan 13, 1997 (17:11) * 1 lines 
 
' it was generally pleasant & not offensive' My opinion too, but isn't that damning with faint praise? It should have been so much more.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 56 of 153: gianine brown  (gianine) * Mon, Jan 13, 1997 (19:37) * 7 lines 
 
I am new to the conversation. I'm Gianine and live in Vermont. I haven't
been able to see anything. So I buy the videos. The Emma in the Critic's
Choice catalog is listed as a 1996 version. Is this the very latest
version? How many versions are there. I know of an older one released in
1972. This 1996 version is not the one with Paltrow in it. I am confused
can anyone straighten me out? Thankyou.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 57 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Mon, Jan 13, 1997 (20:59) * 5 lines 
 
Hi Gianine. Welcome. If the 1996 tape is not the Paltrow version then it must be the ITV/A&E version, a 2-hour TV adaptation that will air next month on A&E. It carries the 96 date because it was broadcast in England in December.

See Bernie's review:

http://www.bluemarble.net/~amyloo/wwwboard/breeches.html


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 58 of 153: gianine brown  (gianine) * Tue, Jan 14, 1997 (09:31) * 7 lines 
 
Thankyou. I have been ease-dropping on your conversations of PP2. I bought
the set of videos for myself at Christmas. I have been a great fan of Jane Austen before all the latest hoopla and have been a member of the Jane Austen
Society for quite sometime. I have been like a kid in a candy store with all these latest versions coming out. It is a pleasure to find a place where
conversation can be had about PP2 and other Videos. My husband thinks I
am being ridiculous. Of-course, he has never read any Jane Austen!!




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 59 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (02:20) * 9 lines 
 
Okay, Hilary and Amy2, I'll have to disagree with you on EMMA (surprise). I thought that mood created was very "Emma," but this may lie in my own personal interpretations of the novel. To me, the book is foremost an exploration of Emma's personality and growth. In this light, the elements of the film fit together rather well. Emma's character - that of a charming young woman who is at once infinitely wise and incredibly dense about relationships - and experience were crafted quite nicely, even if t
e richness of the plot was sacrificed for time constraint reasons.

The filmmakers were obviously straining to fit everything in. They even found room for Mrs. Elton's strawberry expedition, though the all-important group discussion scenes relating to that event got dissed. Mrs. Elton's need and desire to be the belle of Highbury (vs. Emma) and, particularly, the focus of male attention (for example, her desire to win the position as hostess at Donwell Abbey...), I thought, were perfectly illustrated in those scenes. The writers also axed another favorite scene - the o
e in which Mr. Knightley observes Emma, Jane, Frank, and Harriet playing wordgames with the children's alphabets at Hartfield...it not only does Mr. Knightley's powers of intuition and observation credit, but it provides MAJOR clues that something's up with frank and Jane (a very clever idea on Austen's part). Perhaps it isn't a VITAL scene for keeping the action rolling along, but I missed it.

I was also disappointed in the fact that some characters, like John and Isabella, became little more than inconsiquential shadows (most people who didn't know the story wouldn't even remember their names, if it weren't for Emma's "I love John/I hate John!" conversation with Mrs. Weston, and even then the people who put together the theatre trailer took these lines out of context, leading audiences to believe that "John" was George...).

Still, I was pretty impressed by the filmakers' ability to fit in almost every important element, even only if gratuitously. Unless we want a six-hour version, some things have to go. I'm interested in seeing how the ITV version, which is even shorter, hits me.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 60 of 153: Jane   (jane) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (10:39) * 3 lines 
 
THE HAIRCUT! THAT GUY REALLY NEEDED THE HAIRCUT!




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 61 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (10:55) * 1 lines 
 
Jane, are you referring to Mr. Churchill? I guess the thing that got me most about the Paltrow EMMA was the overall tone -- to me, it played more like SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER than Jane Austen. It seemed that the filmmakers went for very light, almost farcical humor rather than exploring the depth of Emma's transformation. I may be out of my element here because EMMA was never one of my favorite Austen novels -- maybe there's too much about her yentalike matchmaking that reminds me of my own family.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 62 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (11:07) * 1 lines 
 
Amy2, Emma slides in and out of being a favorite of mine. I was enchanted on first reading. But I, too, found the Partlow version way too light, even though I am not one of those people who try to make JA too serious and heavy.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 63 of 153: kathleen  (elder) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (14:23) * 6 lines 
 
Amy2 & Amy (also?): I agree w/ your opinions about the McGrath (?) adaptation of Emma, although I grew to like the movie more and more each time I saw it (7 times so far).

The novel has become my third favorite (after P&P and Persuasion), but not for a light tone. Emma's actions are not always for the best interest or happiness of the other parties, as she tells Harriet at the end of the movie, but because she thinks she knows better than anyone else how everything should turn out.

The movie muddled some of the plot by leaving out many important scenes, but this is necessary in a short adaptation. After all, we feel cheated by not having all the scenes we want in P&P2, which comes in at 5 hours or more.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 64 of 153: Elaine  (Elaine) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (14:26) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, I loved the Paltrow Emma. I am always disappointed to find someone who disagrees. Emma was enchantingly light. Didn't the "very badly done, Emma...very bad" scene at least make you want to misbehave? Or what about the kiss? You have to admit that Mr. Knightly knows a thing or two about snogging.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 65 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Wed, Jan 15, 1997 (21:50) * 8 lines 
 
SNORT, Elaine! ;)

You guys, Emma is supposed to be funny! :::) Again, this is ONE INTERPRETATION of the novel. Any single film adaptation is never going to fulfill every reader's expectations, because every reader has a different opinion as to what the book is about. I agree that the Miramax version isn't perfect, but more because of time constraints than a lack of understanding.

As far as the "depths of emma's transformation," I don't think that the novel is about anything as heavy as a moron metamorphosizing into a genius...it is about a sometimes silly, though intelligent, girl learning how to prioritize her life. Even in the novel, it takes a good bop on the head in the form of Harriet's plans for Mr. Knightley to snap her out of it for good. And as for Emma's growing appreciation for Mr. Knightley and what he stands for, I think that the Paltrow version does a great deal...
n the ball scene and post-Box Hill at Hartfield when Mr. Knightley returns...(BTW, I didn't find Mr. Knightley's reproach at Box Hill at all light or enchanting...it made me want to cringe and cry just like Emma was doing...).

The only "learning experience" part I really missed was Emma's unguarded speculation re: Jane and Dixon...perhaps Emma's eagerness to gossip about Jane's personal life, and her eventual embarrassment at learning the truth, should have been explored more...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 66 of 153: Mary C. Fox  (MaryC) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (00:32) * 1 lines 
 
Was anyone else as fascinated as I was about the differences in the dance scene at Netherfield vs the one in Emma which used the same music? I thought the one in Emma far more romantic and flowing in its presentation. The Netherfield dance was far more stiff and formal in style, even though the same arm movements, etc. were used.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 67 of 153: Hilary Talbot  (Hilary) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (03:41) * 10 lines 
 
Kali, its so long since I've talked to you in the chat room ........how are you?

I basically agree with your interpretation of Emma. She is someone who through her immaturity loves to let her wonderful imagination get away from her, distracting her from seeing her impact on other people, and what is best for herself.
I also agree that time was a major constraint for the film makers.

But I was disappointed in much of the casting. I thought some scenes that were left out were crucial - like the spelling out scene. I don't think we easily saw Emma's development which is what its all about.`I agree its meant to be funny, but its not nearly as funny as it should be - look at how much about Mr. Woodhouse is left out. I think we shall just have to disagree......

Mary, I was fascinated with the 2 dance scenes too. They each suited the occasion - the Netherfield one was kind of a battle scene interpretation.




 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 68 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (04:07) * 5 lines 
 
Oh, so you also thought that leaving out the alphabets scene was a "blunder"? ;)

I hear ya, Hilary...and I miss you! I hope we hook up in chat soon...
---
As for the dances...yeah...in Emma, they choreograph Mr. B's Maggot with such ballet-like movements that you hardly recognize the dance...way different takes on the same steps. Amazing. I prefer the Netherfield take, b/c it is more realistic.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 69 of 153: Elaine  (Elaine) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (08:19) * 2 lines 
 
I also preferred the Netherfield version of the Maggot. In Emmathe dancers were physically much closer. It seems they were touching each others' waists and Mr. Knightly was making such transparent overtures to Emma and not with just his eyes, even his legs were invading her territory. In P&P Darcy had only the touch of two hands to work with and those amazing eyes. However, once Elizabeth begins to talk this mesmerizing dance does become a delicious battlefield. Imagine how difficult this scen
must have been to film, dealing with both the steps and the range of emotions conveyed by the actors. In contrast, the Emma scene should have been a piece of cake.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 70 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (10:27) * 2 lines 
 
I have only been able to see Emma once. I don't think it was apiece of cake,it just seemed that it was a faster dance and the P&P2 version was much more intense.The reason for the dances are quite different. This is what how I remember it.In Emma it was to show us (Emma) that Mr. Knightly would dance with Miss Smith and that he is a thoughtful person and gentlemen. In P&P2 is was to show us the sparing between Elizabeth and Darcy.How intense he was to dance with her and so many other reasons. Emma was "l
ght and funny" and P&P2 "proper and elegant". I do like both versions equally. It was a nice feeling to hear MrB. and some of the smae steps in Emma. It aslo promoted P&P2. People(in the theater) in general noticed it right away and (I overheard conversations) were delighted to hear and see familar music and steps again.I also got an idea how many people watched P&P2. Two ladies conversing "Oh that was in Pride and Prejudice". No, I didn't. You'll have to "borrow my tape".LOL!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 71 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (12:33) * 2 lines 
 
Kali, you obviously feel strongly about the Paltrow version of EMMA - I by no means thought it was an abject waste of time like DIE HARD XVI. Even though there are a few scattered attempts at dramatic scenes, such as Knightly's upbraid of Emma at the picnic, I still contend that the overall _tone_ of the film was extremely light. The whole thing almost played like drawing room farce to me: Mr. Elton practically knocking Emma down as he taps on her shoulder; the "try not to kill my dogs" interpolation;
rs. Elton directly addressing the audience at the end, etc. P&P could also be played for the sheer wit of Elizabeth's ripostes, but then we would lose the rest of the story. I fear this was true with EMMA.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 72 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (15:35) * 1 lines 
 
Okay, Amy2, we'll just have to agree to disagree. I must repeat, however, that EMMA is a much lighter story than P&P, after all, and had this been a six-hour version, I think, it would have necessarily included enough elements so as to become more satisfactory to everyone.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 73 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (16:01) * 1 lines 
 
How long is the new A&E version? Does anybody know? Kali, if you come to Hollywood, I will have to make you take a meeting with Peter Guber as vengeance. That would be worse than spending the afternoon with Mr. Collins!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 74 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (18:08) * 1 lines 
 
The ITV version is only two hours too.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 75 of 153: Ann  (Ann) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (21:29) * 3 lines 
 
According to Critics Choice Video, Emma2 is only 100 minutes long.

I just looked at the TV and saw Anne Eliot (Amanda Root)! She's on Mystery in the PD JAmes story "Original Sin".


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 76 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Thu, Jan 16, 1997 (22:06) * 3 lines 
 
Yeah, Ann, and it's great! I can't wait to see the conclusion of OS tonite!
---
Amy2, I live in Stockton and go to school in Berkeley, so I may roadtrip down to take you up on that offer (just to find out who Peter Guber is)...;)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 77 of 153: Anna  (Anna) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (03:51) * 8 lines 
 
Due to a slow response time on my part I only saw Emma2 (Paltrow/Northam) for the first time last week. Considered as an entertainment in it's own right, without reference to JA or authenticity, I like it very well indeed. However, like Amy2, I think that on the whole it is too light.
I find Emma (text) much less light-hearted than P&P; to me P&P has an air of the fairy-tale whilst Emma is far more realistic and darker.
We might have to disagree on that point, but there were some things in Emma2 I thought very well done;
JN, whilst personally delicious doesn't really fit my idea of Knightley for most of the film, but I thought his return from London and the proposal very well done. I actually liked to acceptance written for Emma here better than that for Lizzy in P&P2; Lizzy's acceptance didn't quite ring true for me.
The actress playing Jane Fairfax didn't seem quite right to me, but I only just worked out why; she's too beautiful, even for Jane Fairfax, too exotic,and not really elegant. To me she doesn't look like an english woman of the period at all (note the comment in the making of P&P2 about some actors looking too 'modern').
Emma2 also had an overall different look to both P&P2 and S&S; richer more cluttered rooms, which I suspect is more authentic (at least the clutter). did anyone else notice the quote re colour in Emma on AustenL recently? How they stuck with the style of the regency, but went for colours they thought would appeal to a modern audience? eg red and green at Christmas, bilious green for Emma's dress when she first meets Mrs Elton.
As I am both obsessional and literal this takes the film further from the book for me, but considered in isolation give an interesting touch to the movie; I intend seeing it again, and will pay more attention to the use of colour.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 78 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (11:00) * 4 lines 
 
Kali, come down to L.A. and we will take that trip to Peter! (or at least to Sony Pictures).

Anna: I agree with you in that I think Austen's work became more serious in tone as she herself aged. Hence the light-hearted wit of P&P as contrasted with the sense of loss in PERSUASION. I was also wondering about the actress who played Jane Fairfax -- was she even _English_? I thought she was quite exotic as well. The thing that bugged me the most about Emma is the filmmaker's willingness to let her be the butt of so many jokes -- we _know_ she's misguided, but that doesn't make her a buffoon. Ther
were parts of this that were a little too similar to CLUELESS for me!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 79 of 153: Jane   (jane) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (12:00) * 2 lines 
 
Amy2, The actress playing Jane Fairfax, Polly something, I think is English, and is perfect for the role she plays in Enchanted April, a very beautiful and languid upper-upper crust flapper (unless I'm confused about the era). She's also in Restoration, which I haven't seen. They didn't make much use of her in Emma.
Jane


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 80 of 153: kathleen  (elder) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (12:09) * 6 lines 
 
Jane -- re Polly (Walker?), the actress who played Jane Fairfax in Emma2: she was indeed perfect in Enchanted April (a truly beautiful movie), but seemed too old in Emma2. Perhaps if she had been in more scenes, or had more lines, we could have sympathized w/ her more.

Toni Collette, who played Harriet Smith in Emma2, was also too old (and perhaps too large compared to Gwyneth Paltrow). But we did get to "know" her Harriet better and, therefore, sympathize more.

Anna -- I grew to like this movie more each time I saw it. I hope you have the same increase in enjoyment.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 81 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (21:56) * 14 lines 
 
Yes...it is Polly Walker, and she is English.
---
Amy2 (BTW, thanks for your invite...I'm there!), I don't think Emma was made to look like a buffoon...merely the silly little girl she sometimes is. In the novel, as well, Austen treats Emma as such. Emma is in so many ways a child; allowed to construct views on life without the added benefit of an alert and involved father. Everyone but Mr. Knightley seems to think that she's perfect, and so she goes about her life (and the lives of others) as if her view is the best view (or perhaps ONLY view). When
the reality of a situation catches up with her, she either completely misses the point or gets so smacked by it that she's in a state of shock. It would be sad indeed if Emma never got the point...but she does, to our satisfaction and amused relief. The completeness of both her delusion and epiphany is hyperbolic, which entitles us to some heightened impatience, and, I think, greater amusement at her stupidity.

Just because Emma is one of the "mature" novels, it need not follow that we consider the story and it's themes with utmost gravity. I contend that Austen is of the "slice of life" school (Mansfield Park and Persuasion, perhaps, are most infused with what comes close to "moral lessons"), in which the characters teach us, but need not be vehicles of anything much larger than themselves as specimens of human nature. Emma, as a novel and as a character, "teaches" us about personal growth and aw
reness, but it is not a sledgehammer. Juxtaposed with the poor and sick she tends, Emma has no problems other than those she creates for herself. The greatest potential for tragedy in this novel lies in the possiblity that Emma will never grow up. While the real-life implications of her meddling are very real, it is rather clear to me that those whom her actions might affect (Harriet and Miss Bates, for example, and Frank and Jane through her willingness to gossip with Frank), are quite resilient enoug
to withstand Emma's immaturity. In fact, I think the Miramax Emma makes more of the consequences Emma's actions than the novel in several instances, most notably of Emma's Box Hill stab at Miss Bates.

"Maturity" in writing (both tone and content)need not equal greater moralization or greater distinction of "lessons" at the expense of humor. I agree that the tone of Emma shows a greater understanding and sharper analysis of the human condition, but I contend that it doesn't dampen the humor of the situation. It is poignantly ironic, and humorous, that Emma "knows" everything about everyone except herself. In this instance, Austen's greater understanding takes us beyond the class issue
of P&P, the tragedy of misprioritization in MP, and pain of loss in Persuasion, into the study of problems where the romance of politics and sociology dictate there should be no problems. In Emma, Austen penetrates a tranquil and priviledged little world to pick apart the personality of a girl who should be none of us, but in a very real way represents all of us in her faults. Emma reminds us that it pays to engage in reality checks every once in a while, and that it is never too late to t
y to learn from one's mistakes.
---
Anna, I saw that post on breaking the rules of color, etc., in AUSTEN-L, and I thought it very interesting. I like the idea of tweaking historical realism here and there (but not too much!) to bring something to life in modern eyes. Isn't the exaggeration of reality what gives art its expressive quality?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 82 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Fri, Jan 17, 1997 (21:58) * 1 lines 
 
PS - It's obvious we're getting nowhere on this subject. You all think I'm crazy, and are, I'm sure, ready to lock me up in Bertha Mason's attic! ;)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 83 of 153: Myretta  (mrobens) * Sat, Jan 18, 1997 (07:42) * 5 lines 
 
PS - It's obvious we're getting nowhere on this subject. You all think I'm crazy, and are, I'm sure,
ready to lock me up in Bertha Mason's attic! ;)

Nonsense, Kali. I am quite of your opinion, as you know. I feel that Emma is the most complete of JA's heroines. This is due, not to the serious tone of the novel, but to the wonderful way Emma's shortcomings allow us to understand her character. On the other hand, I'm sure Mr. Rochester would be delighted to find you in the attic one day instead of Bertha! Poor Jane wouldn't stand a chance.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 84 of 153: Anna  (Anna) * Sat, Jan 18, 1997 (17:15) * 4 lines 
 
] You all think I'm crazy, and are, I'm sure, ready to lock me up in Bertha Mason's attic! ;)

Never that Kali ;-) What a dull place the world would be if we all thought the same way on every topic!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 85 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Sat, Jan 18, 1997 (17:48) * 3 lines 
 
Thank you, dearest Myretta and loveliest Anna...

And Anna, the world would indeed be dull if everyone agreed on everything! ;)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 86 of 153: Elaine  (Elaine) * Sun, Jan 19, 1997 (18:30) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 87 of 153: Mary C. Fox  (MaryC) * Sun, Jan 19, 1997 (22:29) * 1 lines 
 
I enjoyed your commentary Kali. Elaine was obviously speechless after reading it ...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 88 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (03:53) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Mary...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 89 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (12:49) * 3 lines 
 
Kali, I had prepared a very elaborate reply, then my modem lost its connection. Drat! I will try to reconstruct: It's my distinct impression that Austen's work grew in depth, and perhaps in disappointment, as she got older. I don't think you can compare the almost giddy, youthful humor of Northanger Abbey to the very real sense of loss in Persuasion. To me, Emma kind of falls midway in her canon as far as seriousness of tone, probably weighting more to the "fun" side. I also have to say that I don't
think Austen's aim was really to show us that "little bit of ivory" she claimed as her palette. Even though she was dealing with the parochial (young English women of good standing) her characters, morality, and themes are so universal that they've stood the test of 200 years. Rather than just presenting Miss Woodhouse to the world & pointing out her particular folley, it seems to me that JA is drawing broader moral implications that might rival even Mary Anne Evans (nee George Eliot). This is just one
writer's opinion. Don't hurt me!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 90 of 153: Myretta    (mrobens) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (12:52) * 3 lines 
 
]This is just one writer's opinion. Don't hurt me!

Gee, Kali. What a reputation! ;-)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 91 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (14:24) * 2 lines 
 
No kidding, Myretta. I won't hurt you...and I didn't mean to imply that Jane Austen doesn't draw any moral implications. She does, as does any writer. However, Jane Austen does NOT present us with moral propaganda, nor does she draw incredibly heavy moral distinctions b/t the "bad," the "good," and the "proper" and the "wrong." This is ground we've covered in the irony and morality thread, Amy2. My contention remains that Emma presents a "life's lesson" kind of experience through clear
eaded humor and astute analysis of a personality. Emma's brain is not an allegory for spiritual revolution. She's a kid who needs to grow up, and finally does. Who can't identify with that?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 92 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (19:51) * 2 lines 
 
I don't want to reprise the Irony & Morality thread here, but I _do_ think that Austen was a moral propagandist. She is very clear in P&P, for example, that Lady Catherine's (and Darcy's initial) equation that gentility = wealth + position is wrong; I also think she placed a high value on the proper sort of "understanding," "sense," that her various characters possessed to varying degrees. Even at the very end of P&P, she's trying to put a proper moral spin on the role Lady C. ultimately played in unitin
Lizzy & Darcy. EMMA is what it is on the surface, and I think we can all agree to that; however, I also think Austen is pretty clearly trying to tell us "don't be a yenta!" Don't meddle in other people's affairs of the heart -- let them fall in love on their own. Now despise me if you dare!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 93 of 153: Amy Bellinger (amy) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (20:11) * 5 lines 
 
I am probably reading too much into Emma, but the very first time I read it, it had lessons for me that go beyond "growing up" an "dont'
help
e
e
,,


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 94 of 153: Amy Bellinger (amy) * Mon, Jan 20, 1997 (20:19) * 1 lines 
 
let me try that again. ...beyond "growing up" and "don't meddle." Like so many of Austen's stories, it's about self delusion, which is broader than growing up or don't meddle. Kali and I and some others were talking about this -- again -- in chat, and we all agreed that JA must have done a great deal of thinkt deluding oneself. We wondered if all this pondering served to break her free of the curse of delusion.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 95 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (10:53) * 1 lines 
 
That is certainly another very important thread in the book, Amy. I also think Austen was a great believer in romantic self-determination; a.k.a., only YOU could make a considered decision as to the person you were to marry. Every time someone else tries to interfere (Darcy with Bingly; Mrs. B. with Mr. Collins; Lady C., etc.) the results are either comical or disastrous.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 96 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (11:19) * 4 lines 
 
Amy2, re romantic self-determination &tc.

See I think that, too, belongs under the heading of "don't kid yourself; know what you want, making the self-delusion theme, well, more a theme than a thread. But perhaps this is nitpicking.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 97 of 153: Jane   (jane) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (13:35) * 1 lines 
 
I also see the theme of self-delusion in Emma, and would also apply it from the perspective of Knightley. It wasn't until Frank Churchill came around and stirred things up that Knightley faced up to his own great love for Emma, and that he needed to be more than a brother to her. Then there is Mr Woodhouse: not the slightest crack in his self-delusion, and who would want to be him?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 98 of 153: kathleen  (elder) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (14:54) * 6 lines 
 
One of the differences between the idea of "growing in knowledge of self" as shown in Emma vs how it is shown in P&P is that Elizabeth doesn't try to "write" other people's stories (i.e., she doesn't try to run their lives) the way Emma does with Harriet.

Elizabeth is amused by other people, and she enjoys her life, but her potential for doing harm to others is less than Emma's, IMO. Emma could have messed up Harriet's chance for happiness; she is mean to Jane Fairfax (the Mr Dixon idea is hers before Frank ever comes to Highbury); and she insults Miss Bates in a very unkind public manner.

I love both of these novels; in fact, I think Emma the more accomplished work of art. I feel that Emma is in greater need of self-knowledge/maturity, than Elizabeth Bennet, however, even though they are about the same age.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 99 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (18:55) * 9 lines 
 
I would say that self-delusion is a thread, self-awareness being a general theme. However, considering the fact that I DON'T consider Austen a moral propagandist (life as she writes it is more complex than a bundle of moral lessons!), I cannot say that the book is more about self-awareness than it is personal growth in general. Emma is not only deluded - she is careless and sometimes thoughtless and insensitive (gossiping with Frank, her comment to Miss Bates, failing to understand the potentia
consequences of her actions), because she does not truly understand the bases of human interation nor the complexity of other people's lives and needs. Overcoming these particular aspects of her character allow her to better understand the workings of society, other people, and herself, as a fully-cognizant human being.

She gains: 1) A greater appreciation for Mr. Knightley (both as a potential mate and as a mature, adult friend); 2) the realization that the truth of a matter (Jane and Dixon, Harriet and Elton, etc.) is not always perfectly evident; 3) that she can't know or fully comprehend every situation at age 21; and 4) the understanding that she can't go on living vicariously through the relationships of her friends, as that tendency is unfulfilling and often futile. She needs to get her own life (who doesn't
). She can't be her daddy's little girl forever, which brings up the fact that she could end up like Miss Bates, cocooning herself in self-congratulation for her "help" to others, as Miss Bates shields herself from the chill of the reality of her situation through incessant yammering.

Emma can't understand her place in society - nor can she prioritize her life based on the options such an understanding presents - until she understands how it functions. She MUST understand that other people are more complex than she often gives them credit for.
---
Amy, I think awareness of others and one's proper relationships to them, which in turn spurs an awareness of self, is crucial to the maturing process. People can't be happy - or at least satisfied that they have exhausted all of their options - until they understand the realities of life. I think that's why Austen wrote this book.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 100 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (19:16) * 2 lines 
 
Kali, you will try to twist this into a growing up book.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 101 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (19:29) * 1 lines 
 
I'm not twisting anything, Amy. That's essentially what it is. Otherwise, she could have made a Miss Bates the heroine in Emma's place. Also, she would have greatly lessened the diversity of the characters' faults and lessons learned, greatly simplifying both the novel itself and the general notion of what maturity is.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 102 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (19:33) * 1 lines 
 
Oh.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 103 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (19:35) * 1 lines 
 
Is that an I-understand-where-you're-coming-from "oh," or an I'm-shining-you-on "oh" ?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 104 of 153: Anna  (Anna) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (19:44) * 14 lines 
 
Amy ] twist this into a growing up book.

In my opinion there is no twisting required! Emma is more than just a growing-up book, even Northanger Abbbey is more complex than that, but Emma is a growing up book, amongst other things.

Kali ] I DON'T consider Austen a moral propagandist (life as she writes it is more complex than a bundle of moral lessons!)

Kali, I agree with you on this point, it's what I meant when I said I considered Jane Austen to be moral but not a moralist in the Irony and Morality topic. In Eric's absence there be no-one in this group to argue the contrary case.

Kathleen ] Elizabeth is amused by other people, and she enjoys her life, but her potential for doing harm to others is less than Emma's,

Kathleen you have summed up my opnion on P&P compared to Emma much more elegantly than I could have done; thank you. A few days ago Kali (I think) asked me in chat why I find Emma much less light-hearted than P&P; this is the reason.
My view of these 2 books is strongly coloured by the way I look at the central character. One could well argue that many people are badly-off at the end of P&P for reasons social and/or financial, whereas Emma ends happily for most. However the happy endings in Emma arise despite Emma's meddling; she inflicts considerable and undeserved emotional pain on Jane Fairfax, Harriet, Miss Bates, Mr Knightley. The happy outcomes at the end come from the grace of Jane Austen alone.
So, I find Emma 'darker' than P&P because of the pain Emma inflicts on others and because of the damage that 'good fortune' (in the shape of the author) alone
averts.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 105 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Tue, Jan 21, 1997 (21:19) * 1 lines 
 
I have read that most writers write about what they know and have experienced.This could be the case with Emma and Persuasion but with Pride and Prejudice what I beleive this was the her dream of the prefect man she would like to have married.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 106 of 153: Karen Bowdre  (Karen) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (00:22) * 5 lines 
 
After reading through these posts, I think I have figured out why I prefer Emma the least of all of adaptions I have seen. Yes Emma needs to grow up but she lives in a bubble. I never really connected with Paltrows's version of her; I am hoping that Kate Beckinsdale's interpretation will move me more.

JA and morality. I strongly believe JA was intensely moral and it is evident in all of her novels. Morality does not have to be preachy or negative. Nor is it simple. If morality were easy to determine, Darcy would have been solely a pompous proud man. Sometimes good people do bad things and bad people do good things. The key was often determining who the bad people were and not judge them but do not have them as initimate friends.

Question re ITV/A&E Emma. I posted this one another thread but here it goes. Why are two versions of Emma out so closely together? Is it similar to the Dangerous Liasions/Valmont situation?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 107 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (00:27) * 11 lines 
 
I think you're right, Donna...
---
Anna, forgive me for recovering this ground, but I'd like to go on record with it...;)

The happy outcomes at the end come from the grace of Jane Austen alone.

The same could be said for P&P. As far as I see it, had P&P been reality, Lydia would remain a ruined woman, and the rest of her sisters would pay for it in spinsterhood, dependent upon the Collinses for support. To me, this fate is much worse than anything Emma could possibly have brought upon herself.

In the case of Emma, Emma is blessed with an unusually small and doting circle of friends. They are hardy, essentially decent people who like and respect her very much, and aren't seriously or permanently affected by any of her childish actions. Emma is rich, well-meaning, and well-loved. And she's a smart girl - she WILL come around eventually, the question is, how long will it take, and how miserable will she make herself before Mr. Knightley gives her the good yelling she needs to makes
her realize that she's not as important as she thinks she is? Even at her deepest dispair at offending Miss Bates, at losing Mr. Knightley, and at totally misunderstanding Frank and Jane, her fears are overexaggerated (which is quite natural...especially in young people so used to flying glibly through life without cares). Any heaviness we might feel as readers, it seems, is that which Emma is feeling herself. But then we realize, as Emma does, that the fears are unfounded, we can be happy again, and w
resolve to never, EVER again set up ANY of our friends...or gossip...or go on picnics when we're PMSing... ;)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 108 of 153: Anna  (Anna) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (01:08) * 5 lines 
 
Kali, I think I understand what you're getting at, but we're going to have to agree to disagree on this one.

Emma bothers me more than P&P, possibly because it's closer to some of my own unpleasant experiences than any thing in P&P. It's more an emotional response derived from my own history than a rational response, and thus not susceptible to change by argument.

You are right about the picnics though ;-)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 109 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (10:59) * 3 lines 
 
Well, I think this thread has attained a most excellent level of argument and discourse! I find myself agreeing with just about all of you, though we might be at loggerheads over some particular points. As far as Austen's morality, I think she is a very _subtle_, even a guerilla, moral propagandist. She is not hitting us over the head with a steel bar like a Dickens or an Eliot; however, I think she makes it pretty darned clear which characters & traits she approves of; and which she decidedly doesn't.
If Austen had no moral agenda, perhaps she would have conveyed that Lydia's elopment with Wickham was perfectly fine, and that Miss Bates deserved to be dissed in public for being a chatterbox. However, where propriety, sense, and the all-important understanding are concerned, she remains incredibly consistent throughout all of the six novels. One could say that her moral P.O.V. is practically unwavering. I also wanted to say that I too see Emma as more than just a "coming of age" book -- the lessons s
e learns about herself are certainly just as profoud if not more so than Lizzie's: "Until this moment, I never knew myself."


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 110 of 153: Jane   (jane) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (14:34) * 11 lines 
 
From Kali:
). She can't be her daddy's little girl forever, which brings up the fact that she could end up like Miss Bates,
cocooning herself in self-congratulation for her "help" to others, as Miss Bates shields herself from the chill of
the reality of her situation through incessant yammering.

First of all, in Miss Bates's defense, I would characterize her as admirable for her ability to appreciate the small blessings of her life. I don't sense self-congratulation here, but rather an cheerful outlook in what could be a really grim situation. Emma could do a lot worse than to be like Miss Bates, in some ways. Granted, Miss B is incredibly irritating, and would sorely try my patience.

Next, a comment on all of our relative ages. I do not want to offend anyone or make it seem as though the opinion of a 21 year old is worth more or less than that of someone older or younger. Our ages influence our perspectives, certainly, and may contribute to our differences above? Kali, at Emma's age (but more fun, and nicer) sees Emma in terms of the maturing that Emma needs. I'm older (38) but can still relate to Emma's mistakes: do I need to grow up, or can I interpret the lessons of Emm
in terms of perception/self delusion, an issue for any age?

When I read Emma first (in my early 20's) I disliked her intensely, and found the whole plot to be irritating and disturbing, as it was clear that Emma was endangering Harriet's happiness most seriously. After another 2 readings I have come to like her much more, and appreciate her human frailty.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 111 of 153: Hilary Talbot  (Hilary) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (14:56) * 2 lines 
 
I'll go with the self-delusion theme, with Anna's ideas about damage, and I think our age does colour our ways of understanding things sometimes, as jane mentions. I also don't want to forget the comedy in Emma.
As for gossip and pms on picnics....wish us luck in Aust in Feb.!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 112 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Wed, Jan 22, 1997 (22:27) * 8 lines 
 
Amy2, "coming of age" is not necessarily followed with "unpoignant"! I think the benefit of a coming of age story is that so much can be done with it! After all, coming of age is to understand the situations and motivations driving the society around you. It is the most universal rite of passage that any social being experiences. It is a period of time when general knowledge, morality, politics, and psychology begin to gel together in your own mind. This is the time when you become able to build a fr
mework of beliefs, knowledge, and ideas for yourself, and in turn use that frame work to conduct your own life. Life's events and experiences suddenly appear interconnected. It becomes evident that life is humorously, bitingly, fittingly, even, ironic (Thanks, Alannis!). It is a wonderful time, full of high highs, and some very low lows. In general, it is a hopeful, positive time, however. Some of the most important discoveries of your life will be made at this time...but not all! Emma is great beca
se she recalls to you your own coming-of-age expereinces, while at the same time reminding you that you haven't gotten everything figured out just yet (thanks again, Alannis!)...

The experience in Emma is brilliantly conveyed because in so many ways, it is realistic, universal, even commonplace (even though the main character herself is not necessarily someone we can all readily relate to). As I said before in I&M, the value of experience in Austen is not so much the "lessons learned," but the process of learning itself. I think that Austen understood the value of education through one's own experiences - and others' too, but not to the same extent. I DON'T belie
e that she was a guerilla propagandist. Her messages and themes come through clearly enough. THe fact remains, however, that they must share space with eachother, within her "slices" of life.

Jane, rest assured that I was not intending to accuse Miss Bates of being self-congratulatory! I was accusing the alternative-dimension Emma of the future of that fault! ;)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 113 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Thu, Jan 23, 1997 (10:59) * 2 lines 
 
I was thinkig of "coming of age" stories in terms of classical mythology/fantasy, along the Joseph Campbell lines. I guess we've just seen so darned many of these in movies & books (STAR WARS, for one; & usually from the Young Man's perspective) that at this point, it bores me completely. I do think EMMA is about a lot more than just a young girl growing up, tho this is certainly an integral part of the story. I'll go with Amy's theme of self-delusion, applicable to all of us AT ANY AGE, as the central
trope of the story. As far as Alannis is concerned -- do you think we can start the Alannis Morisette Channel? Cause that's all you hear on the radio these days!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 114 of 153: Johanne  (JohanneD) * Thu, Jan 23, 1997 (11:29) * 1 lines 
 
coming of age : in a way, that makes me laugh, since were learning every day whether you're 7 or 77 :)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 115 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Thu, Jan 23, 1997 (11:46) * 2 lines 
 
That is true, too, Johanne, too true. I feel positively 12 many days.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 116 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Fri, Jan 24, 1997 (11:12) * 1 lines 
 
Amy, you're ahead of me. Most of the time, I feel old & tired.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 117 of 153: Saman Moeed  (Saman) * Fri, Jan 24, 1997 (15:37) * 10 lines 
 
While searching for something else (a Crowded House article - Hilary ;), I found an interview with Gwyneth Paltrow which you might find interesting. Sorry I can't do those cool link things, but it's at:

http://www.theage.com.au/ent/
(Melbourne's The Age newspaper)

Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but I don't have time to read through all the above articles.

It looks like there are quite a few graphics which I can't see because of my text-only browser.

Enjoy.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 118 of 153: techn-incompetent  (Saman) * Fri, Jan 24, 1997 (15:38) * 1 lines 
 
Hey wow - it does those "cool link things" automatically!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 119 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Fri, Jan 24, 1997 (17:52) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Saman...I'm glad you posted that...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 120 of 153: Hilary Talbot  (Hilary) * Sat, Jan 25, 1997 (13:25) * 4 lines 
 
'coming of age : in a way, that makes me laugh, since were learning every day whether you're 7 or 77 :)'

Much what I was thinking while reading. The traditional 'coming of age' that happens around say 18 - 21, is, as Kali says, a very exciting and mecurial time.
But it happens just as markedly in many different forms and times.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 121 of 153: Kathleen Grant  (Kaffeine) * Sat, Jan 25, 1997 (19:25) * 4 lines 
 
For those of you who share my great affection for Mr. Jeremy Knightly (Kali), I have a new offering. I rented PHENOMENUM tonight - and while I've only just started watching the movie, it was already money well spent - there's a promo for EMMA on it! So I, of course, got out my Snappy and have several photos to post to my Jeremy Northam pages (some sound files too - but it was my first attempt at creating .wavs and I didn't do a great job. Did manage to get "Try not to kill my dogs", though).





 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 122 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Sat, Jan 25, 1997 (19:59) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Kaf! I like that pose and mischievious side-long glance very well! ;-)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 123 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Sun, Jan 26, 1997 (05:45) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 124 of 153: Johanne  (JohanneD) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (11:15) * 1 lines 
 
Isn't he a definite contender to an honorary drooling thread here? The demand will certainly rise in next March


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 125 of 153: Ann Rydberg  (Ann2) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (11:57) * 1 lines 
 
Yes Kaffein,this man undoubtedly has got both looks and a look. I particularly remember how becoming those white shirts are to his skin colour. Certainly worth some drooling space. And his body is rather ligth and pleasing, especially when MrBeveridge´s(?) tune is played.Thanks for pic.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 126 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (13:40) * 1 lines 
 
Shall we secede and start our own drooling topic, Ladies?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 127 of 153: Johanne  (JohanneD) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (13:46) * 1 lines 
 
Pretty please


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 128 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (13:52) * 1 lines 
 
Of course, you are welcome to introduce a Northam topic, here. But maybe Kaf's site could use your enthusiasm.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 129 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (13:52) * 1 lines 
 
Okay, I'm going for it...anything for you, johanne...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 130 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (13:52) * 1 lines 
 
We can do both...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 131 of 153: Johanne  (JohanneD) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (14:25) * 1 lines 
 
Pretty please


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 132 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
I just read something of interest in The Hollywood Reporter archives. Apparently, there's yet A THIRD version of Emma in the works -- this from the BBC, and it's another five-part mini-series. It's not scheduled for later in '97.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 133 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (19:14) * 1 lines 
 
No way! (re 3rd Emma) Why? Why not try MP or something?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 134 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (21:21) * 1 lines 
 
I agree, Amy...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 135 of 153: Rebecca Davey  (Becks) * Mon, Jan 27, 1997 (23:24) * 1 lines 
 
I love JA adaptions, but this will mean OVERKILL!!!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 136 of 153: Kali Pappas  (Kali) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (01:00) * 1 lines 
 
Hey, we should produce our own version. We can have, like, ten of each character in this one...it will get it out of everyone's system for good that way...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 137 of 153: Myretta   (mrobens) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (07:05) * 1 lines 
 
I think Emma deserves more than a two hour treatment. I wish it had been the P&P2 team, but I'm open to others.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 138 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (11:17) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe we should do an adapatation that combines all six hours, and it can run longer than a double feature of GWTW & HOW THE WEST WAS WON!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 139 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (11:17) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe we should do an adapatation that combines all six novels, and it can run longer than a double feature of GWTW & HOW THE WEST WAS WON!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 140 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (11:17) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe we should do an adaptation that combines all six novels, and it can run longer than a double feature of GWTW & HOW THE WEST WAS WON!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 141 of 153: Mari Topitzes  (Mari) * Tue, Jan 28, 1997 (12:04) * 1 lines 
 
Amy2, I like the suggestion, even three times :)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 142 of 153: Amy Wolf  (amy2) * Wed, Jan 29, 1997 (19:49) * 1 lines 
 
Sorry -- I was having a lot of trouble with the Spring at that moment. I guess if you really want to make a point, repeat it thrice!


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 143 of 153: Susan Christie  (Susan) * Fri, Jan 31, 1997 (22:57) * 3 lines 
 
#133 through 135: Is it really possible to have too many Jane Austen adaptations?
Bring them on, I say; they're still preferable to most of what else is out there, and besides,
don't we need more to talk about?


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 144 of 153: Anna  (Anna) * Sat, Feb  1, 1997 (00:20) * 3 lines 
 
] we need more to talk about?

hence the DDL drool thread... ;-)


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 145 of 153: Susan Christie  (Susan) * Sat, Feb  1, 1997 (00:31) * 1 lines 
 
Just spreading the drool around...


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 146 of 153: Inko  (Inko) * Sat, Feb  1, 1997 (22:57) * 20 lines 
 
I was in a bookstore today and saw an article on the new A&E Emma in (dare I say it) Romantic Times. For all those enquiring minds that want to know I bought it to exerpt some of the article here.

It's got four very nice photos of the 2 and a half hour production.

"We at RT have seen the critics' screening of "Jane Austen's Emma" and assure you it is a fine and authentic production, quite accurately depicting the lifestyle of the period. You will be able to enjoy the lush English scenery much as it was in Ms. Austen's age (1775-1817) in this version, which was filmed over six weeks in the heart of the English countryside.

"Lovers of historic costumes will revel in the splendid 19th century attire designed by Oscar winning costume designer Jenny Beavan....

"The stately homes featured in the production include Trafalgar Park, former home of Lord Nelson, near Salisbury; Sudeley Castle in Gloucestershire; and Broughton Castle near Banbury....
"The village of Lacock, in Wiltshire served as the fictional village of Highbury."

(Lacock also served as Meryton in P&P2. When I visited it last summer I had lunch at the Red Lion Inn and saw a letter displayed on a wall from the producers of Emma thanking the village for their hospitality. Shooting had finished about a month before I was there.)

The article continues about the food production - had to look lavish and yet still be edible.

"Said screenwriter Andrew Davies, ... ‘Emma is a longer book than P&P. An awful lot of it goes on in Emma's head, so I had to find a way to show her thoughts and feelings and at the same time, portray her character so she didn't come over as just an interfering bossy bitch who plays God! In the end, the two elements had the same solution--we filmed her match-making ideas as imagination sequences picturing couples' future lives together.'

"The other major change comes in the latter part of the book which Andrew compressed into one scene. ‘There are 40-odd pages resolving the various strands which I pared down, putting the essential meaty bits of it into one scene at a harvest festival supper. I'm sure Austen devotees will be a bit shocked at first, but I hope they will understand the reasons for it,' he said.

"Sue Birtwistle, ....this time around has joined into artistic collaboration with screenwriter Andrew Davies to co-create "Emma" as well as wear the producer's bonnet. And, along with "Emma" scriptwriter Susie Conklin, Sue has penned the insightful "Emma" companion book, The Making of Emma.


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 147 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Sun, Feb  2, 1997 (08:57) * 5 lines 
 
VIDEO RELEASE DATES: A&E EMMA MARCH 7,1997

JN 7 GP VERSION:.......................... APRIL 15,1997
info:http://www.tbvg.com/



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 148 of 153: Donna  (Donna) * Sun, Feb  2, 1997 (09:54) * 1 lines 
 
JN & GP version....................APRIL 15,1997


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 149 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Sun, Feb  2, 1997 (14:41) * 2 lines 
 
Not until April 15? Rats!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 150 of 153: Cheryl Sneed  (Cheryl) * Sun, Feb  2, 1997 (14:43) * 2 lines 
 
Ooh Amy! I really like how that outline frown looks against the white background! Cool!



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 151 of 153: Amy  (Amy) * Sun, Feb  2, 1997 (14:49) * 2 lines 
 
That's the main reason I like while backgrounds -- no transparentizing required.



 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 152 of 153: Angie  (Angie) * Fri, Feb 14, 1997 (20:15) * 5 lines 
 
Is there a blunder in the Miramax version of Emma? I was reading Emma recently and in my book it says she falls in love with George Knightly. But, in the Miramax version, Emma says "I love John..." Isn't John Knightly her sister's husband? Can someone who has the book also check this out for me? I'm not sure if my book is wrong or if the movie had a blunder. Please E-mail me at narf197332@aol.com if anyone finds out. Thank you.



Angie


 Topic 3 of 69 [movies]: Emma
 Response 153 of 153: Candace  (candace) * Fri, Feb 14, 1997 (20:57) * 2 lines 
 
Emma is referring to her brother-in-law when she goes through the "I love John, I hate John" dialogue. If I remember correctly, this is a result of Emma speculating on advise that John will give George regarding Harriet and herself.


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