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Topic 18 of 96: science in the news

Tue, Oct 28, 1997 (08:16) | Paul Terry Walhus (terry)
Science in the news.

95 responses total.

 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 1 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 28, 1997 (08:16) * 69 lines 
 

U.S. biophysicist admits passing secrets to Russia


WASHINGTON (Reuter) - U.S. biophysicist Theodore Hall, the
youngest member of the Los Alamos team that developed the atomic
bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, admits in a new book that he
passed nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union.
Statements from Hall, who is now 71 years old and living in
Cambridge, England, appear in a new book, ``Bombshell: The
Secret Story of America's Unknown Atomic Spy Conspiracy.''
The book, published by Times Books/Random House, arrives in
bookstores this week and will be officially released Oct. 1.
Statements from the book were released Sunday.
In over 100 hours of interviews with the book's authors,
foreign correspondents Joseph Albright and Marcia Kunstel of the
Cox Newspapers, Hall told of his concern about a possible U.S.
monopoly on nuclear weapons and said he felt no remorse about
sharing information with the Soviets, since they were U.S.
allies at the time.
FBI and National Security Agency documents cited in the book
show that Hall was the target of an FBI espionage investigation
in the 1950s and 1960s, but was never charged.
No comment was immediately available Sunday from the FBI or
the Justice Department.
``During 1944, I was worried about the dangers of an
American monopoly of atomic weapons if there should be a postwar
depression,'' Hall is quoted as saying.
``To help prevent that monopoly I contemplated a brief
encounter with a Soviet agent, just to inform them of the
existence of the A-bomb project.''
Hall said he anticipated a very limited contact, but things
turned out differently.
``Now I am castigated in some quarters as a traitor,
although the Soviet Union at the time was not the enemy but the
ally of the United States; the Soviet people fought the Nazis
heroically, at tremendous human cost, and this may well have
saved the Western Allies from defeat,'' he said.
He said some people had even argued that he changed the
course of history with his action. ``Maybe the 'course of
history', if unchanged, would have led to atomic war in the past
50 years -- for example the bomb might have been dropped on
China in 1949 or the early fifties,'' he said.
``Well, if I helped to prevent that, I accept the charge.''
Hall, then 18, was recruited from Harvard University -- where
he was active in radical student politics -- in 1943 to become
the youngest physicist at the Los Alamos bomb laboratory in New
Mexico. He was made part of the team that worked on implosion
experiments that led to the invention of ``Fat Man,'' the bomb
dropped on Nagasaki in August 1945.
``In 1944 I was nineteen years old -- immature,
inexperienced and far too sure of myself,'' Hall told the
authors. ``I recognize that I could easily have been wrong in my
judgment of what was necessary, and that I was indeed mistaken
about some things, in particular my view of the nature of the
Soviet state.''
``But in essence, from the perspective of my 71 years, I
still think that brash youth had the right end of the stick. I
am no longer that person; but I am by no means ashamed of him.''
Hall suffers from kidney cancer and Parkinson's disease. He
worked for most of his scientific career as a research
biophysicist and expert on electron microscopy at Cambridge
University's prestigious Cavendish Laboratory.
The book contained many details of Hall's espionage
activities, including his recruitment in 1948 of two more
American atomic scientists codenamed ``Anta'' and ``Aden'' to
join the network of U.S. scientists spying for the Soviet Union,
two informants whose identities have never been revealed.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 2 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Tue, May  5, 1998 (21:35) * 5 lines 
 

anyone want to say anything about the discoveries of angiostatin and
endostatin regarding cancer? anyone here working in that field? i for
one am happy about the news, as i have a long history of cancer in my
family.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 3 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, May  8, 1998 (11:34) * 1 lines 
 
http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9805/06/space.explosion/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 4 of 95: NICK DELLACATO  (NICK) * Wed, May 13, 1998 (22:22) * 8 lines 
 
MY FATHER IN LAW JUST DIED OF CANCER FOUR WEEKS AGO. HE HAD IT FOR TWO YEARS.
HE JUST WENT DOWNHILL. THE DOCTORS SAID IT WAS TOO LATE TO TRY ANY EXPERIMENTAL
DRUGS OR ANYTHING. HE DIED AT 82. THEY SAID HE WAS TOO OLD. HE HAD OTHER PROBLEMS TO BOOT.

ITS ASHAME THOUGH. IT SEEMS LIKE SCIENCE IS ON THE VERGE OF MANY NEW BREAKTHROUGHS

NICK



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 5 of 95: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Tue, Jun  2, 1998 (17:06) * 1 lines 
 
my sympathies nick, I hope your father's 82 years were full of quality life!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 6 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Tue, Jul  7, 1998 (19:19) * 3 lines 
 
Environmentalists are ringing the alarm bell about the fate of the Tibetan antelope, saying the demand for the animals' precious cashmere wool in the world fashion market has led to a deadly threat by poachers who are hunting down the animal, sometimes killing hundreds of them at a time.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9807/05/tibetan.antelope/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 7 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Tue, Jul  7, 1998 (19:21) * 5 lines 
 
A human skull believed to be between 100,000 to 200,000 years old is being hailed as an important discovery in the evolution of humankind.

Scientists believe it may be a link between the transition from Homo erectus, sometimes described as the hand-axe culture, to the earliest modern humans.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9807/05/s.africa.skull/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 8 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Wed, Jul 22, 1998 (20:52) * 5 lines 
 
Researchers clone first mammals from adult cells using new technique

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Researchers in Honolulu have successfully cloned five generations and more than 50 identical mice, using a new technique they say can be applied to other mammals.

http://cnn.com/HEALTH/9807/22/cloning.report/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 9 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Wed, Jul 22, 1998 (20:55) * 3 lines 
 
A sheep cloning how-to, more or less

http://cnn.com/TECH/9702/24/cloning.explainer/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 10 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Wed, Jul 22, 1998 (20:58) * 5 lines 
 
Astronomers observe a "cannibal" pulsar stealing matter from companion star

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (CNN) -Using X-ray telescopes, astronomers have observed for the first time a so-called "millisecond" pulsar in the process of cannibalizing a companion star.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9807/22/cannibal.pulsar/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 11 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Wed, Jul 22, 1998 (21:00) * 5 lines 
 
Scientists make plans for seeking life beyond Earth

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California (AP) -- Scientific discussion of extraterrestrial life has moved beyond the question of whether it exists to where and how we should look for it.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9807/21/new.worlds.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 12 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Jul 22, 1998 (22:41) * 1 lines 
 
great selection of mind candy, ratthing!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 13 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (09:29) * 2 lines 
 
Wow, great stuff. I don't have time to look now, but tonight I'll check
it out.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 14 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (16:26) * 2 lines 
 
Cool.
Ray, I saw a programme on BBC the other day where they said there might me a chance that Dolly wasn't a clone at all.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 15 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (16:50) * 18 lines 
 

yes, that was one of the very exciting things about the current mouse
clonings. In the case of Dolly, the original paper that described the
technique used to create her left out some genetic tests that would have
demonstrated whether she was a true clone or simply the product of a
mistake in the lab.

when the authors of this new mouse paper first submitted it for publication,
it was rejected on the grounds that there were no tests conclusively
demonstrating that the new mousies were actual clones. so the
workers went back to the lab, made a whole mess o' mousies, and did
the genetic tests.

the results were conclusive and accepted for publication: the same
tecque used to create Dolly did in fact work for creating
cloned mice. these results suggest that Dolly is probably a real
clone, and, most importantly, that the technique used to one her
is effective!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 16 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (19:59) * 4 lines 
 
I find the bits I read from time to time about gene technology scary and exciting at the same time. One that excited me was about the possibility of 'growing' limbs and things (don't know it that has to do with gene technology or what, so forgive me). I think it must be horrible to lose and arm or leg - would it not be wonderful if they could just grow you a new one? You think that will happen in our lifetime, Ray?
Oh, and I saw this programme about organ transplant, and doctors seemed optimistic that in time they would be able to do head transplants. In fact one doctor did it with monkeys (which I find horribly cruel). But again, when you think that people who are in wheelchairs could be helped, it is a great vision to have.
What scares me about gene technology is the idea that it can and may well get into the wrong hands. Imagine people like Hitler (thank God that bastard's dead)
being cloned.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 17 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (21:50) * 11 lines 
 


one of the creepier things i read about one time had to do with the
fact that someone had developed a method to develop reptile
embryos without heads! the implication was that one could have
a headless clone created of oneself, thus insuring a steady supply
of replacement organs.

the technology already exists! messing with genetic materials is
very very dangerous. i personally feel it is more dangerous than
nuclear power.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 18 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Thu, Jul 23, 1998 (23:27) * 3 lines 
 
done in England with frogs, Ray...
little headless hoppers...had to stop the research...
and, no, have know idea where I read about it...


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 19 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Jul 24, 1998 (02:59) * 1 lines 
 
God, that's disgusting. Why not just figure out how to grow organs? If they can grow limbs, than surely that should come next?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 20 of 95: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Fri, Jul 24, 1998 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
Good point!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 21 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (04:24) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you, thank you?

Sorry to go off the topic, Ray, I just want to ask Autumn something quickly:
Autumn, didn't Juliette's picture come out wonderfully in art? Did she take a look? Tell her I want MORE please!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 22 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (07:08) * 1 lines 
 
Ray, where do you get your science news?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 23 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (07:40) * 1 lines 
 
He MAKES it!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 24 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (11:01) * 9 lines 
 

oh i wish!

most of it comes from cnn.com. i also subscribe to Science News, a
wonderful little weekly magazine that summarizes all sorts of
scientific findings. every major news site on the web has a
science section, so the news is not hard to find!

www.sciencenews.org


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 25 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (12:45) * 1 lines 
 
So what exactly do you do, Ray? Do you teach science? Do you sit in a lab, doing experiments all day? Do you make exciting discoveries and write difficult theories down? Must be so cool having such a brainy job.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 26 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (14:06) * 15 lines 
 
the history of my career is oh-so weird. here it is in a nutshell:

* right now I am a consultant with EDS in san antonio, texas working in the area of knowledge management

* prior to that i was a technical consultant and chief knowledge officer for a small telecommunications firm in san antonio

* prior to that i was a postdoctoral research fellow at a large biomedical institution. i did research on the neurochemistry of depression and anxiety. also did research related to the genetics of alzheimer's disease.

* prior to that i was a graduate student and did research on the neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of analgesia and reinforcement. i also studied evolutionary biology and philosophy.

so i used to sit in labs all day buy not any more. now i sit in meetings all day (haha!). i have taught for the past 11 years and continue to teach biology, philosopy, and information technology courses around san antonio.

my research efforts right now are directed toward artificial intelligence, specifically the development of intelligent agents that can surf and index the web, diagnose mental diseases, and befriend lonely people!

I really do enjoy my job with EDS, but it is highly hectic and i really have no control over my own schedule. my dream job would be to be a faculty member at some school or institute where i could continue my AI research and teach.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 27 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (23:13) * 1 lines 
 
which languages do you prefer for AI?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 28 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (01:03) * 1 lines 
 
Oh wow, that sounds so cool! And where is your AI research going at this point? I mean, what are your visions for the future, say, like in 100 years from now?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 29 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (08:20) * 2 lines 
 
Have you approached UT or any other colleges yet?



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 30 of 95: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (21:42) * 1 lines 
 
Did you meet your fiancee through your work?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 31 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Mon, Jul 27, 1998 (17:03) * 15 lines 
 

ooooh! good questions! my AI coding usually takes place using C, C++,
Lisp, Perl. i use a lot of libraries written in C, and work
extensively with the SOAR expert system.

my vision for the future is that we will have machines like the HAL
9000 computer in "2001" within the next 50 years. i am certain
of this, but dont think that I will have anything much to do with
it.

I havent approached any colleges yet for a couple of reasons:

1) faculty jobs are few and highly competitive
2) they dont pay very well. i am paid extremely well with EDS and
would have a tough time going back to making $30-$40 per year!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 32 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Mon, Jul 27, 1998 (22:39) * 10 lines 
 
I wish I made $30-$40 per year...
do you read PC AI, Ray? if so, what do you think of it?

and, think we (meaning of course, you...) could write a
genetic algorythmic conference and/or participant? or,
what sort of expert system direction would you like to
see the Spring take?

(unfortunately(?), I think the fuzzy logic topic on
here should be in Philosophy...)


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 33 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Wed, Jul 29, 1998 (21:03) * 9 lines 
 

whoops, make that $30K-$40K per year!

i do read PC AI. i really do not get that much out of it myself, tho
i do like the ads that are in it.

I definitely think that most of the AI topics we discuss here on line
should be crosslinked between multiple confs, like science and
philosophy. AI is not just one field and is very multidisclipinary.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 34 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Jul 29, 1998 (22:48) * 1 lines 
 
the k's were implied in my response, also...


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 35 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul 30, 1998 (06:25) * 2 lines 
 
Do you know how to crosslink a topic, Ray?



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 36 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Jul 30, 1998 (09:59) * 3 lines 
 

ummmmm, nope, but i am certain that it is in a manual somewhere on
armindale's web site or on the WeLL.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 37 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul 30, 1998 (10:29) * 10 lines 
 
It's easy, just create the topic. Say you create a topic called
biological warefare in science and it's topic 22. Then go to politics
and type

li science 22

If it doesn't work for, just ask wer to do it as cfadm

It should work if you own the topic.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 38 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Jul 30, 1998 (20:59) * 2 lines 
 

thanks, terry!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 39 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jul 31, 1998 (04:31) * 2 lines 
 
No sweat, just for fun I linked this topic to news. I went to news and
typed li science 5 (or whatever the topic number was in science).


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 40 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Jul 31, 1998 (09:09) * 6 lines 
 
Studies point to space as origin of life's seeds

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- Three studies published Thursday cast more light on how life originated on Earth, painting a picture in which space dust provided the seeds, and a warm, volcanic environment supplied the incubator.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9807/30/origins.reut/index.html



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 41 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Jul 31, 1998 (09:12) * 5 lines 
 
Galileo resumes beaming science data to Earth

PASADENA, California (AP) -- The Galileo spacecraft touring the moons of Jupiter is again sending science data back to Earth after a glitch that forced a shutdown last week.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9807/30/galileo.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 42 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jul 31, 1998 (12:48) * 2 lines 
 
Forgot to pay it's long distance bill?



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 43 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Aug  5, 1998 (11:54) * 1 lines 
 
What are we talking about? Long distance bill? For what, Terry? Is my phone bill suddenly going to shoot up for clicking on the hyperlinks - note the fancy new word in my vocabulary?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 44 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Aug  5, 1998 (17:36) * 1 lines 
 
scroll back a bit


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 45 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug  6, 1998 (01:20) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, okay, I'm with you again. And relieved.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 46 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Aug  6, 1998 (10:02) * 2 lines 
 

i'm glad you're back, riette!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 47 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug  6, 1998 (10:36) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you, Ray - glad you're back too.
How was your business trip?




 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 48 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Thu, Aug  6, 1998 (22:00) * 7 lines 
 

my trip went really well, actually. of course i spent most of the time
in meetings, but some of them were actually fun and productive.

the biggest thing that happened was that i have officially become a
member of the EDS Government Consulting Group, which means (hopefully)
some more money!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 49 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug  6, 1998 (22:22) * 2 lines 
 
Mo' money! Yo, Ray.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 50 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug  7, 1998 (01:04) * 1 lines 
 
Great! Congratulations, Ray! You're going to be and MMM from now on. A More Money Man.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 51 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Aug  8, 1998 (14:00) * 7 lines 
 
Scientists on quest for deep sea mud

(ENN) -- Scientists aboard the world's largest scientific drill ship, the JOIDES Resolution, are getting ready to study a cold-water current that today is 100 times the size of the mighty Amazon River.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9808/06/joides.yoto/index.html

This is a cool story because it reflects the enormous complexity of the weather systems of the earth. THe Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) is a massive current of cold water that circulates through the Southern Ocean and into the Pacific. Scientists are hoping to correlate it's stregth, temperature, and direction with global climate changes, and they will be using the sand the DWBC pushes around as an indicator of it's strength, temp, and direction.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 52 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Aug  8, 1998 (14:05) * 5 lines 
 
Scientists map evolution of phytoplankton

(ENN) -- Evolving into diverse forms over billions of years, tiny one-celled marine plants and bacteria have interacted with the changeable physics and chemistry of the land and sea to stabilize the relative concentrations of Earth's atmospheric gases, according to a report in the recent issue of the journal Science.

This is a very cool story reflecting how important phytoplankton is to the world ecology. The things we are doing to the environment are affecting phytoplankton, and there is no way to predict what will come of this!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 53 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Aug  8, 1998 (15:21) * 1 lines 
 
That sounds very interesting indeed. I find the whole thing about ecology quite fascinating, though I don't have a perfect understanding of how it works. On the farm where I grew up partly, ecology was very important, and alot of my granddad's work consisted of making sure that the balance between plant and animal remained perfect - he always said that even small errors in keeping the balance (over grazing, high or low mortality rates, and such things) could result in serious problems.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 54 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Sat, Aug  8, 1998 (22:33) * 19 lines 
 

well dont feel bad riette, because no one has a complete understanding
of how these things work!

i also grew up in a farm and ranch setting, and to this day i am
amazed at how my grandparents were able to maintain both a productive
set of crops and keep a stock of animals going. it is a set of
knowledge that predates written human history, and modern science
is just now trying to come to grips with it.

another good example of how delicate ecosystems can be is
illustrated when an outside species invades an new and foreign
environment by accident. a classic example is that of the goddamn
fireants we have here in texas. fireants were introduced to this
country from south america via boatloads of soil. now the goddamn
things have invaded virtually every part of the southern U.S. and
have brought many native species close to extinction. two of these
species are ones that i grew up with and have fond memories of
from childhood: red ants and the horned lizard (aka "horny toads").


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 55 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (01:47) * 5 lines 
 
Horny toads!! Think we have a few on the spring too!

We had this weird bird plague on the farm once. Tiny birds, called 'vink' - but I don't know what they're called in English. Anyway, there were so many of them, they'd snap the branches of trees like twigs when they all descended at once to sit in the trees. It was really disgusting, and their crap clogged up the water pumps and everything. In the end it got so bad that my granddad and the men made many catapults out of desperation, and gave everyone these - women and children included. Because all
ne had to do was to shoot into the air with a biggish stone, and the birds would fall two at a time. I did it once, a bird fell, and I was so sorry for the poor thing, I nursed it back to health - which Granddad didn't find particularly helpful.
But it was awful. I'm not sure how he got rid of the birds in the end, but it was a disgusting business, and he had thousands of rands of damage, and the farm took almost two years to recover from the plague.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 56 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (07:41) * 1 lines 
 
Where was this, Riette?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 57 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (13:04) * 1 lines 
 
Have you got a map of Namibia in your hand? Well, it was in the north east, close to the border, and on the border of Hereroland, a small Herero 'country' in Namibia. Beautiful, absolutely beautiful flat land with savannah fields, leopard, lion, zebra, springbok, kudu, oryx, duiker, porcupine, warthog, poisonous snakes, ostrich, etc.etc.etc. A wonderful place to grow up, I can tell you. Where did you grow up, Terry?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 58 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Aug 10, 1998 (06:49) * 2 lines 
 
Chautauqua, Illinois and St. Louis, MO, with a brief spell in Texas (1st
grade).


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 59 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 10, 1998 (08:23) * 1 lines 
 
Was it a nice place to grow up?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 60 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Aug 10, 1998 (11:31) * 1 lines 
 
It was a wonderful place, a fairybook sort of town (Chautauqua).


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 61 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 10, 1998 (16:30) * 1 lines 
 
In what sense? Were the houses made of chocolate?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 62 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (06:21) * 12 lines 
 
Chautauqua was a little summer town nestled between two majestic bluffs
on both sides and by the Mississippi River on the other side. There was
only one road leading to it, and a dinky train ran along the river.

We packed off for Chautauqua every summer of my childhood. The place had
everything a kid could dream about. Tennis, roque, croquet, swimming,
community sing and movies nearly every night, hiking, fencing, archery,
baseball, basketball, etc. etc. The open air movie theater turned into a
nondenominational Sunday School on Sunday morning.

It was everything America should be, and isn't. A real community,
centered around kids.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 63 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (06:52) * 2 lines 
 
That sounds fabulous. Do you ever go back there now, Terry? And how far is
it from Austin? Is there a bus/train one can catch to go there? See, I'm thinking of places to visit when I go to the spring party in Austin next year - I want to stay for a week or ten days if I can, and see what there is to see in the area. How about art? Are there any art galleries to visit? But these thing have to be a bus/train journey away - I don't drive, I'm ashamed to say. One doesn't need to in Switzerland, that's why.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 64 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (06:57) * 5 lines 
 
It's several hundred miles to the North in another state, Illinois. So
it's a major outing. But there is so much to do and see right here in
central Texas. It would be impossible to cover this territory in any
short period of time!



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 65 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (10:55) * 1 lines 
 
So what is there to see in central Texas? You want to go open a topic in travel, and tell me more about the sights and sounds of Texas? Don't want to muck up Ray's topic, but I would love to know what to expect.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 66 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Aug 11, 1998 (11:21) * 1 lines 
 
Sure, I'll open it later! In travel.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 67 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Aug 12, 1998 (16:32) * 47 lines 
 
I am the proud owner of one of these camcorders:

Sony halts camera that can see through clothes

Copyright © 1998 Nando.net
Copyright © 1998 Reuters News Service

TOKYO (August 12, 1998 09:36 a.m. EDT http://www.nandotimes.com) -
Electronics giant Sony Corp. said Wednesday it had halted shipments of
some video cameras after finding they could be used for filming more of
their subjects than meets the eye.

Some versions of the Handycam have infrared technology which lets users
shoot at night or in darkness in a "night shot" mode.

But magazine reports revealed that when the special feature is used in
daylight or a lighted room with a special filter it can "see through"
clothing -- underwear can show up, especially on those lightly dressed,
and people wearing swimsuits look almost naked.

A Sony spokesman said the first the company knew of the camera's surprise
feature was when reporters started asking for comments on the "new way"
of using the camera.

Sony technicians then experimented and confirmed that the technology had
the unintended capability.

"When we developed this feature for the Handycam, we were thinking of
people filming night views -- their children sleeping, or perhaps the
nocturnal behavior of animals," the spokesman said.

Concerned at the possibility of less innocent users taking advantage of
the technology, Sony has modified the camera so the "night shot" mode
only works in the dark.

Shipment of the new versions have already begun, replacing the original
ones, which hit the market in March and had sold around 180,000 units in
the domestic market by the end of July, the spokesman said.

It sold 870,000 of the original cameras worldwide by the end of June,
including 400,000 in North America and 290,000 in Europe. The spokesman
said it is now shipping the modified version overseas.

He denied local media reports that it had asked stores to remove the
original versions from their shelves. The company declined to confirm
retail prices, but media reports said the cameras range from $684 to
$1,368 in Japan.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 68 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Aug 12, 1998 (16:50) * 2 lines 
 
Will I get a knock at my door? How hilarious. I must test this.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 69 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (06:15) * 1 lines 
 
You're really into technology and equipment, aren't you, Terry? BTW, thank you for helping me with the picture-thing. Haven't manage a single successful one again, but I'm sure I'll get the hang of it. Thank you.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 70 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (09:45) * 4 lines 
 
You only need to put your url in quotes to make it work. I went in as
super user and fixed all your minor little booboos in 'art'. You were a
hair breadth away from getting it perfect.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 71 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (13:04) * 3 lines 
 
°BIG BIG BIG HUG°

Oh, sorry! Did I hug your wind out?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 72 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (14:06) * 4 lines 
 
No, I have too much of a wind surplus, it felt good though.

Just make sure your images are gifs or jpegs that end with .gif or .jpg.
You can img src a url that ends with .htm or .html.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 73 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (19:30) * 1 lines 
 
terry: POST THOSE PICTURES!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 74 of 95: wer  (KitchenManager) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (00:39) * 1 lines 
 
especially if'n you can get Stacey in front of that camera...


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 75 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (03:46) * 1 lines 
 
What pictures?


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 76 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (03:46) * 1 lines 
 
Hey, Ray!!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 77 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (08:54) * 2 lines 
 
Which pictures?



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 78 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (09:06) * 2 lines 
 

any pictures you can capture from your Sony camera.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 79 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (11:30) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, I almost forgot! Terry's Tantalizing Tool!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 80 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (11:30) * 1 lines 
 
Ray, I thought you were going to post us your photo.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 81 of 95: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (11:43) * 2 lines 
 

oh yeah, i will try to do that today!


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 82 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 14, 1998 (12:44) * 1 lines 
 
That'll make my day.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 83 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Aug 15, 1998 (22:11) * 2 lines 
 
I've got to get the right filter first.



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 84 of 95: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug 16, 1998 (01:44) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, I know just what you mean...


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 85 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (16:18) * 8 lines 
 
New "night vision" auto system detects faraway people, animals in the dark

August 20, 1998

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A man on the side of the road changing a tire, a deer or dog darting into the street -- all hazardous and potentially deadly confrontations for a driver at night whose sight is limited to what is illuminated by his headlights.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9808/20/night.visioncar.ap/index.html



 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 86 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (16:20) * 6 lines 
 
More wet, dry areas worldwide in recent decades
August 20, 1998

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Regions of Earth experiencing unusually wet or dry conditions have increased over the past 20 to 30 years, researchers say in a report that will add to the debate over global warming.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9808/20/wet.dry.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 87 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (16:21) * 7 lines 
 
Milky Way reportedly ripping apart neighbor galaxies

August 19, 1998

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- The Milky Way's gravitational pull is ripping apart two smaller neighbor galaxies, astronomers in Australia announced Wednesday.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9808/19/dueling.galaxies.reut/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 88 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (16:27) * 5 lines 
 
Magic of Perfect Shuffles

S. Brent Morris likes to say that he’s the only person with a doctorate in card shuffling. A mathematician at the National Security Agency (the world’s largest employer of mathematicians) in Fort Meade, Md., he is also a showman, specializing in card tricks. Morris demonstrated a number of feats of legerdemain at last month’s Mathfest in Toronto

http://www.sciencenews.org/sn_arc98/8_1_98/Mathland.htm


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 89 of 95: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (18:41) * 2 lines 
 
well, that's why i never see horny toads anymore. hate those fireants. they're so
aggressive.


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 90 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Sep 12, 1998 (21:47) * 8 lines 
 
Alien species push native animals near extinction

September 10, 1998
Webposted at 6:35 PM EDT

CARDIFF, Wales (Reuters) - All is not well in the animal kingdom and man is to blame for introducing rogue species into the environment, scientists said on Thursday.

http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9809/10/science.animals.reut/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 91 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Sep 12, 1998 (21:50) * 8 lines 
 
Global Surveyor finds mysteries on a Martian moon

September 12, 1998
Web posted at: 10:17 a.m. EDT (1417 GMT)

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Phobos, the larger of Mars' two small moons, is covered in hip-deep dust formed by meteoroid impacts over millions of years, according to images captured by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9809/12/martian.moon.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 92 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Sep 12, 1998 (21:53) * 10 lines 
 
Oldest extraterrestrial debris offers clues to early conditions on Earth

September 10, 1998
Webposted at 2:20 PM EDT

(AP) -- It's old dirt, but it's old dirt that scientists can't get enough of.

Cosmic grit that survived a fiery ride from space 1.4 billion years ago has been discovered in a layer of sandstone in Finland, offering a glimpse of conditions on Earth during the earliest stages of life's formation.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9809/10/cosmic.grit.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 93 of 95: Ray Lopez  (ratthing) * Sat, Sep 12, 1998 (21:54) * 8 lines 
 
Global Surveyor finds mysteries on a Martian moon

September 12, 1998
Web posted at: 10:17 a.m. EDT (1417 GMT)

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Phobos, the larger of Mars' two small moons, is covered in hip-deep dust formed by meteoroid impacts over millions of years, according to images captured by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor.

http://cnn.com/TECH/space/9809/12/martian.moon.ap/index.html


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 94 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug 12, 2001 (16:12) * 24 lines 
 
The World's No.1 Science & Technology News Service
New evidence for vCJD risk from lamb
15:02  03 August  01
Andy Coghlan
New experiments suggest sheep eaten by British consumers in the early
1990s might have been infected with BSE.
The fear is that if people have eaten infected sheep, they might
develop variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (vCJD), the human equivalent
of mad cow disease. BSE-infected sheep could pose a greater human
health risk than infected cattle.
So far, the assumption has been that sheep cannot naturally contract
BSE. Scrapie, the sheep equivalent of mad cow disease, is not thought
to pose any risk to humans.
Researchers at the Institute for Animal Health (IAH) at Compton in
Berkshire injected mice with liquefied brain tissue from 3000 sheep
diagnosed with scrapie in the early 1990s. The preliminary results
suggest that some of these sheep might in fact have been suffering from
BSE.
"If BSE did spread to sheep it would be serious," says a spokesman for
the UK Food Standards Agency, which has issued a bulletin warning of
the early results.
"
continued at
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99991115


 Topic 18 of 96 [news]: science in the news
 Response 95 of 95: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Feb  3, 2002 (08:02) * 1 lines 
 
More support for the vegetarian cause.

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