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Topic 86 of 96: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction

Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (02:35) | Paul Terry Walhus (terry)
Media coverage of the War in Iraq. I just did a google search for "talk to journalist in Iraq" and came up with the wonderful starting point of http://www.cyberjournalist.net/tips_and_tools/ which is a journalists resource for Iraq War coverage. It's pretty amazing, in the first few minutes on the site I was able to get panoramic views of Iraq streets scenes where I could zoom in on high resolution details, I could watching streams of Iraqi TV ("But because these are only available in certain countries, you have to trick the sites to thinking you're coming from countries like the Netherlands"), and actually use the NY Times "Iraq Navigator"

Another great resource page is:

http://www.cyberjournalist.net/features/iraqtips.htm

There's also:

http://www.freepint.com/gary/audio.htm

is a page which focuses on direct links to broadcasters providing English language news either live or in individual segments.
7 responses total.

 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 1 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (02:38) * 5 lines 
 
Let's start with those panoramic views:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/mmedia//041103-12p.htm

These were done by the Washington Posts Travis Fox.


 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 2 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (02:41) * 5 lines 
 
If you want to see a dynamic map of where the embedded journalists are in Iraq, try this poynter.org site:

http://www.poynter.org/content/content_view.asp?id=27071

You can find a journalist on the map, click on their symbol and get their latest dispatches via a google search.


 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 3 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (02:47) * 3 lines 
 
Another very decent compilation of Iraq War journalist resources:

http://www.journaliststoolbox.com/newswriting/iraq.html


 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 4 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (02:59) * 50 lines 
 
Former Adversaries Join to Revive Neighborhood
By Michael Slackman, Times Staff Writer

BAGHDAD -- There was no electricity, no health care, no open shops, no
sewage system, no police and no one to turn to for help. The people
were scared, hungry and tired, and many children were falling ill.

So religious leaders stepped in. From loudspeakers mounted atop
mosques in the low-income west Baghdad neighborhood known as Tobchi,
sheiks and imams sent out a call, not to prayer, but to work. They
called on doctors, electricians, police, engineers, shopkeepers and
laborers to help their community get back to life.

By Monday, many had come forward. Sunni and Shiite. Agents of Saddam
Hussein's regime and victims of its repression.

If there is hope for a bright future in this city, still convulsing
from the effects of war, a model might be this neighborhood of simple
concrete apartment buildings and working-class people less than a mile
from the Tigris River.

"There are no Arabs, no Kurds, no Sunni, no Shia," said Sheik Mohammed
Bakr Basri, 31, one of the organizers of the back-to-work campaign.
"After Saddam we will all be united. The regime tried to divide us."

Almost from the moment Hussein's government fell, this city of about 5
million people became unhinged with widespread looting, chaos and
fear. People were paralyzed, and no one went to work. But there was no
suggestion that the Iraqis bore any responsibility for what was
happening on their streets. They blamed the U.S. for the upheaval and
expected Americans to repair the damage.

That attitude has begun to change in ways that are visible in many
parts of the city, but especially in Tobchi, a neighborhood formally
known as Al Salam.

It was seen up in a cherry picker Monday, where two residents, one
Sunni and the other Shiite, worked together to repair power lines. It
was evident in a health clinic where a physician and a dentist
volunteered to treat their neighbors. And it was there in the piles of
looted goods that had been turned over to Sunni and Shiite mosques by
residents who experienced a change of heart.

"Saddam confiscated our capabilities and possibilities," said Sheik
Mohammed Taqi, 27, a neighborhood Shiite religious leader.

"After Saddam, brotherhood has been revived between the people."

More:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/iraq/inside/la-war-tobchi15apr15,1,24458.story?coll=la%2Dhome%2Dheadlines


 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 5 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 16, 2003 (03:28) * 6 lines 
 
http://www.back-to-iraq.com/archives/000365.php

This an amazing web journal of a couple of journalists who have just landed in Syria.

"The Pitch
Hi there! Thanks for stopping in. I'm Christopher Allbritton, former AP and New York Daily News reporter. Last summer I went stumbling around Iraqi Kurdistan, the northern part of Iraq outside Saddam's direct control, looking for stories. (Some might call it "looking for trouble.") Well, I've made it back. With the support of thousands of readers, I've raised more than $10,000 for this trip. "


 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 6 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Nov  3, 2003 (12:29) * 44 lines 
 

US apology paves way for Iranian pistachios, carpets
by Scott Peterson

They were words that Iranians have long waited to hear from American
officials, and they sounded very much like an apology.

In an American initiative to boost the chances of Iran-US détente
after decades of estrangement - and after elections in Iran last month
that brought two decades of conservative control in parliament to an
end - sanctions were lifted last week against Iranian carpets,
pistachios, and caviar.

But far more significant, Iranians say, is US Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright's attention, for the first time, to historical
grievances of American meddling in Iran.

"In the Iranian psyche, these issues are far more important than
sanctions, so this will have a great impact," says Nasser Hadian-Jazy
at the University of Tehran. He compares their importance in Iran with
the days of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that few Americans can forget:
the hostage-taking of US diplomats for 444 days.

Despite certain opposition from hard-line clerics, who still consider
the US the "Great Satan," this apology is "good enough to bring down
psychological and symbolic barriers to improve relations," he says.

Though the US still accuses Iran of what it calls "objectionable"
policies of supporting terrorism, opposing the Mideast peace process,
and pursuing nuclear weapons, Dr. Albright also struck a contrite chord
that few in Iran thought possible.

A CIA-backed coup in 1953, Albright said, was "clearly a setback" for
Iran that partly explains continued resentment. "Sustained" US backing
of the regime of the Shah, which "brutally repressed dissent," didn't
help either.

American backing of Iraq during the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s, she
added, has proved "regrettably shortsighted," and the US "must bear its
fair share of responsibility" for the US-Iran hostility.

More:
http://search.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/03/24/p9s2.htm



 Topic 86 of 96 [news]: media coverage of the War in Iraq and the reconstruction
 Response 7 of 7: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jun 13, 2004 (04:28) * 3 lines 
 
Abuse Inquiry Expanding

WASHINGTON What began as a military investigation of seven Army reservists accused of tormenting Iraqi prisoners now appears likely to become a wide-ranging examination of top civilian and military leaders.

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