Prev topicNext topicHelp

Topic 12 of 100: Classical music

Sun, Dec 8, 1996 (21:10) | Paul Terry Walhus (terry)
Classical music discussion.
49 responses total.

 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 1 of 49: Ricardo Filipo  (Rico) * Mon, Feb  3, 1997 (23:18) * 2 lines 
 
I think the classical is dieing because ins't more useful.
I think too the Net can help the music to survive wen find the interested public.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 2 of 49: KED KOBIK  (Undertaker) * Sat, May 10, 1997 (13:44) * 4 lines 
 
Classical still lives today. So many songs have been taken from classical, The Flinstones theme was taken from a Bach song. Metallicaís "Call of Kthulu" can be heard in one of Bachís lute suites. Diamond Headís "Am I Evil" is actually the introduction from Holstís "Planets." Listen to any of any one Van Halenís solos and you can hear the similarity between him and any classical composer. I know there is more than that too. I know it's not classical but Metallica also ripped of a piece from "West Side
Story" for "Don't Tread On Me". Techno artists are constantly taking samples for their songs from Classical music. So I would have to say it's alive and kicking.

KED


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 3 of 49: Alessandro  (Alessandro) * Tue, Sep  2, 1997 (02:03) * 10 lines 
 
Hello. I think classical music is the basis for any kind of modern music.
I've been studying baroque music (1700), especially in Germany area about
organ music, and whoever listens to this music should agree with me.
I think Bach is the heart and the main point of the history of music: you can
find in it nearly every "seed" for all musical kinds, from his era up to now.
Please listen to some Praeludium and Fuge, or to the Brandenburg Concerts, and
you'll realize immediately that this music is still alive and present in our
modern traditions (the rythm and musical phrasing may have changed, but some
"underpath" has survived).



 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 4 of 49: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Sep  2, 1997 (04:45) * 1 lines 
 
Can you give us some specific examples? I'm interested in hearing more about this thesis.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 5 of 49: Sam Blob  (Afor) * Sat, Dec 13, 1997 (12:43) * 3 lines 
 
Watch "Mr. Holland's Opus" and you'll get a classic example (pun realised but continued with anyway) "Love Concerto" by The Toys is actually based on Bach's "Minuet in G". THe chorus from "This Night" by Billy Joel is taken from a Beethoven piece.

Bach is unrivalled by any composer since. He is truly the father of modern music.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 6 of 49: Wolf  (Wolf) * Sat, Dec 13, 1997 (15:53) * 1 lines 
 
Bach is great! As is Mozart and Beethoven............


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 7 of 49: Stacey Vura (stacey) * Mon, Dec 15, 1997 (18:36) * 1 lines 
 
Handel...


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 8 of 49: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Mar 14, 1998 (17:13) * 5 lines 
 
Classic music of India and tres cool:

http://www.ancient-future.com/theka.html




 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 9 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Jun  2, 1998 (16:10) * 5 lines 
 
You like Bach, Wolf? So do I! I adore his music!! Just bought a CD arranged
for big orchestra by Stokowski. It's WONDERFUL - sweet and flowing, all the
'dryness' of a smaller orchestra just melts away. It's great. I love Mozart too,
especially his piano sonatas, and some of Beethoven's works, like Eroica.
Handel I don't listen to so much - can you recommend, Stacey?


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 10 of 49: Leplep le Plep  (jgross5) * Tue, Jun  2, 1998 (21:25) * 8 lines 
 
When I listen to Handel he always just tells me your name, Riette,
and doesn't go into it.
I keep saying, "Handel, give it up, dude, open your eyes, MAN!
What is one to do with you, brotha? How 'bout if we start by me
introducing you to Homer Simpson? Would you like that?
Good. Homer this is Handel. Handel, Homer. Oh, you know them, Homer?
The cardigans? May I, then? Thanks. Handel these are the Cardigans.
Cardigans, Handel."


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 11 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (00:52) * 3 lines 
 
Cardigans, this is Jim Gross - don't worry, he always talks a bit strangely. But
you'll get used to him, he's actually quite sweet. Why don't you ask him what
other classical/non-classical music he likes?


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 12 of 49: Leplep le Plep  (jgross5) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (01:36) * 6 lines 
 
Bach is something I just heard about for the first time tonight.
I'm gonna have to find out what that band sounds like tomorrow.
Does Bach have like 4 people in it, or 5, or is it more like one
a those big ol' symphony bands? I tell ya, symphony bands are pretty cool, cuz i like the bass viol instrumentalists.....even if they keep havin'
me barred from their basketball games, I'll never stop galloping after
their concerts and gigs.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 13 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (01:49) * 6 lines 
 
ha-ha, very funny.
Tell me, Jim, do you ever say anything that makes remote
sense, or are you really in another world? I mean, I'm beginning to wonder whether, if you say you talk to Beethoven, you ACTUALLY do. You know . . .
things just come out so wild and twisted with you.
I mean, basketball games . . . BACH?!?!? What sick part of your brain formed
that connection?!?! Enlighten me!


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 14 of 49: Leplep le Plep  (jgross5) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (02:19) * 21 lines 
 
I'm just goofy.
And warm.
See, I just warm up to you and...
well it doesn't have to do with any part of my brain.
Didn't even know I had one, actually.
Me and Beethoven sleep together most weekends,
if you're wondering how, or, I mean, WHY we talk so much.
You do know he reads lips, right?
Well sometimes he kisses them.
Mine? Not yet.
He laughed at me tonight when I discovered your real last name.
He knew it all the time and was holding back.
He's over here for probably just 5 more minutes.
Usually I go to his place.
Are you having a good night, tonight?
Handel sayin' anything to ya, or is he bein' a silly sulker?
You two are a pair.
Well, it can only get better
is all I can say.
Buhbye 4 now.



 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 15 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (06:52) * 2 lines 
 
And what does that mean - we're friends again? 'Cos the last time I spoke
to Ludwig he told me you were pretty darned mad at me . . .


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 16 of 49: Leplep le Plep  (jgross5) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (14:12) * 10 lines 
 
Lud wigs out on occasion
gotta take what he says with a grain of salt
sure it wasn't Handel?
Lud tells me Handel's real into ventriloquism lately
throwin' other people's voices all over the place
probably threw Lud's at ya that time
Lud tells me Handel's trying out for lead vocals with the Spice Girls
could you ask him for me if that's really true?




 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 17 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Jun  3, 1998 (15:37) * 9 lines 
 
But I never talk to Handel - I don't even know him! And I'm not the kind of
girl who chats guys up, so don't expect it of me either! So, anyway, as you can see, it can't have been him I was talking too. Well, I'm glad you're not mad anymore . . . that's and apology, I think.
But you know William (Walton) said he'd perhaps go for lead with the Spice Girls - I talked (tackled?!) with him just a few hours ago. He's not quite sure yet though - I think he's a little afraid of them. Probably afraid of irreversable willy
erecto syndrome! Don't think they'll take Handel though; his very name makes
labels him somewhere between pervert and control freak - which means he'll
probably steal the show, and that they would not neccessarily want. Hell, why
don't YOU just try out? I mean, with your being 'dysfunctional' and all, and you
can't possibly have moves worse than theirs, so you'll fit right in, and have alot
of boobs and thighs to admire at the same time. Perfect deal!


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 18 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Jul 20, 1998 (09:13) * 2 lines 
 
This weekend I heard Vaughan Williams' 'Serenade to Music' for the first time.
It is one of the most beautiful pieces of music I have ever heard. What a wonderful composer he is.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 19 of 49: Mike Griggs  (mikeg) * Mon, Jul 20, 1998 (16:46) * 2 lines 
 
Beethoven's piano sonata number 14 in c# minor. commonly known as the "Moonlight Sonata". incredible. the third movement has brought me to tears with it's pure passion.



 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 20 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Jul 21, 1998 (00:41) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, how right you are. Some people think it kitch, I think it's fantastic. Have you heard is 'Eroica'? I heard a recording with Otto Klemperer conducting. It's unbelieveable.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 21 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Jul 21, 1998 (00:49) * 2 lines 
 
You know the friend who is supposed to know where to find the champaigne truffles? She is Otto Klemperer's daughter, Lotte. She is now in her mid seventies, but a beautiful, beautiful lady, and incredibly young at heart. And despite the fact that her father is regarded as one of the greatest conductors of this century, she is as normal as anyone - except that she gives people champaigne truffles after they've given birth, and are supposed to be breastfeeding!!! Her brother, Werner, became quite a famo
s actor in America.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 22 of 49: nick a'hannay  (pmnh) * Sat, Jul 25, 1998 (15:19) * 1 lines 
 
(klink)


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 23 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (00:41) * 2 lines 
 
klink?
What's that?


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 24 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (00:42) * 1 lines 
 
Hey, Nick, are you into art? Would you like to come to the arts conference? It has a gallery now where you can share your art if you want.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 25 of 49: nick a'hannay  (pmnh) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (00:42) * 3 lines 
 
into art a little... but my tastes are pretty, ummm... obvious, i guess...

col. klink was klemperer's role on "hogan's heroes"...


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 26 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (00:42) * 3 lines 
 
Oh, right! I never saw any of his programmes - Lotte just told me he made it as an actor in New York.

As far as your 'obvious tastes' in art are concerned - I really cannot imagine what kind of things you like. The old masters? That I almost can't imagine. I mean you're a Texan Poet - how am I to tell? At least come at tell us who your favourite artists are. I could post some of their work, and we can discuss it. If you want, that is. If you don't, then that's that, and that's okay too.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 27 of 49: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sun, Jul 26, 1998 (00:42) * 4 lines 
 
my bet would be that he likes William Blake
and traditional Celtic art with a possible
taste for fantasy, especially Sanjulian, Keith
Parkinson, and Frank Frazetta...


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 28 of 49: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Jul 29, 1998 (05:13) * 1 lines 
 
hmm . . . Or perhaps he's a Degas man? Big mystery.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 29 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (02:54) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

I like Tchaikovskys works mainly but also the Planets Suite by Holst, Bolero by Ravel, Les Preludes by Lizst as well as Pomp and Circumstance No.1 and 4 by Edward Elgar. "I vow to thee my country" was done to the tune of Jupiter. All seven movements of the Planets suite are spectacular, but Mars stands out to me for its ice cold military tone. When I hear the opening beat of Mars the first thing that I think of is a column of armour on the move.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 30 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (13:48) * 1 lines 
 
I agree with all of your choices, but Jupiter does it for me from Holst. There is too much disonance in the rest - intentional, of course! As Ihave commented before, give me anything classical composed before the atonal 20th century composers took over. I simpley don't buy the excuse that Beethoven was the be all and end all of symphonice composers, even if he is my favorite. Surely the spark of genius is still being ignited in the human soul. Why are so many composing noise?


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 31 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (02:19) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

What do people think of Ravel's "Bolero". I LOVE it - the suspense as the music draws closer to the climax and the thrill of the final 40 seconds is spectacular. The percussion to me is the central element of Bolero because the music looses it's beat and power without a strong central percussion. I have listened to the piece so many times, I think Mum's and Dad's copy on LP is probably to deterioate at some stage.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 32 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (14:58) * 3 lines 
 
As regards Ravel's "Bolero" - it touches me on many levels. I have loved it since early childhood when its subtler meaning was not yet known to me. Now I consider it the ultimate in seductive music. Before Bo Derek got to it, I had noticed the nuances and persistant pounding rhythms.

How does it affect you?


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 33 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Sat, Mar 16, 2002 (03:38) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

One of its striking features of Bolero is the precision of the beat and the instruments. A missed beat is immediately noticeable. Some conductors tend to give the string instruments too much or the percussion not enough power and the central percussion element I mentioned is less notable.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 34 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (03:31) * 6 lines 
 
Hi all

I like Tchaikovsky as well. He has written some superb works, of which the most famous I tend to think is the 1812 Overture, but I love the piece, Capriccio Italien for it's brilliance and grand opening. I played a simplified version for piano when I was having music lessons and I think I did pretty well with it.
Tchaikovsky has written too many pieces for me to remember them all but Marche Slav is fashioned in a similar way to the 1812 Overture with the Tsarist hymms, and is quite lively. Symphony No.5 (theme from the 4th Movement)and the Symphony in general has some really graceful segments, though Violin Concerto in D major (Op.35), almost moved me to tears.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 35 of 49: Sam Blob  (AlFor) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (06:41) * 1 lines 
 
And of course there's Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, and the Nutcracker Suite. I wonder which is more famous, the 1812 Overture or the Nutcracker Suite...


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 36 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (15:22) * 5 lines 
 
Sam, Good question. Universally, I suspect the most popular is The Nutcracker Suite. They drag it out each christmas and all little children are taken to see it.

Then is there is the William Tell Overture. Do you think The Lone Ranger caused immortality to come to Rossini by using it for the background theme? I think it is likely the most popular of all classical music with the opening theme of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. I think immortal music is not being written very much anymore. I wonder why!

I have happily sat through about 40 hours (10 performances each 4 hours in length) of Swan Lake. It remains my favorite Desert Island Music.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 37 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (00:59) * 6 lines 
 
Hi all

I have a question for Marcia. It is based on the Mount St Helens documentary "Anatomy of a volcano", and I was wondering if you knew what the music played near the end when they show footage of the August 7, 1980 eruption.
I would actually in due course like to know also what the dramatic music used to show the May 18, 1980 eruption and the cool segment of the helicopter flying over the crater. I love that documentary as much for the wicked music as anything else.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 38 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (20:54) * 1 lines 
 
Wow, good question. I need to see it again and listen to the music more carefully. Rob, did your brother ever find a way to capture the Mir video on the net??? I still love that music and I have no clue what it is, either.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 39 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
perhaps the next lecture of the course on volcanoes will include that video - you can be sure I will be listening to the background this time.


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 40 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Tue, Mar 19, 2002 (16:24) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all

No. Which is a shame. But I did mention it to Craig, though I do not think he got around to doing anything about it.

I originally thought the music at the end (August 7 eruption)was something from Tchaikovsky because I remembered a piece on the Tchaikovsky album "Tchaikovsky - Melody master" that sounded similar to that.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 41 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 19, 2002 (19:14) * 2 lines 
 
If you ever find the tune I most probably identify it for you. I'm about to write to space.com to ask them how I can get - or buy - a copy of the Mir footage. It is that special to me. Highly evocative music. I love it!
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/missions/mir_fiery_finale_page.html


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 42 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Thu, Mar 21, 2002 (01:24) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

I like Les Preludes by Franz Liszt. The music is some of the most vibrant and glorious I have ever heard, with the spectacular finale being worthy of fireworks (I think you could put a fireworks performance to Les Preludes fairly easily).

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 43 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 21, 2002 (18:36) * 3 lines 
 
Oh yes!!! You do know I spent one spring as an apprentice pyrotechnician? I can imagine fireworks for lots of stirring stuff and ALL of JOhn Philip Sousa.

I'm delighted you are enjoying Les Preludes. What the next one you need? I'm making a list and checking it twice!!!


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 44 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Wed, Mar 27, 2002 (01:44) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

I can play Fur Elise on the piano by the way. I was taught it several years ago, and although I would need some practice, it was one I became very good at.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 45 of 49: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 27, 2002 (15:56) * 2 lines 
 
I can, also. I think all piano students learn it sooner or later. It is neat fo play Beethoven when you are not as skilled as the rest of his works require.



 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 46 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (05:08) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

Being the person on the kettle drum in Mars - Bringer of war, Bolero, 1812 Overture, maybe Les Preludes would be neat, because you would attract the focus of the audience. I recall hearing Bolero being performed and the opening bars where all you can hear is someone on a side drum beating out the rhythm, and there is a light focussed on him.

Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 47 of 49: Sam Blob  (AlFor) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (10:07) * 7 lines 
 
"I think immortal music is not being written very much anymore. I wonder why! "

Let's see, recent immortal music:

I think I'll offend a lot of people by indicating Star Wars Theme and Darth Vader's Theme as possibilities for immortal music... Maybe Theme from Raiders Of The Lost Ark as well...

And then there's "Miserlou" by Dick Dale and "Walk, Don't Run" by Johnny Smith (covered by The Ventures)


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 48 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (03:48) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all

I get to take a Peruvian friend on Saturday night to a classic featuring, as Marcia put it one time, "the ultimate seduction music" - Bolero, by Maurice Ravel. I am really really looking forward to it.



Rob


 Topic 12 of 100 [music]: Classical music
 Response 49 of 49: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (03:49) * 5 lines 
 
Me again

That should be classical music concert.

Rob

Prev topicNext topicHelp
music conference Main Menu
In Association with Amazon.com